Saturday, May 21, 2011

“Pennsylvania’s Failing Public Schools” 2011 National AP Achievement List from the College Board


Pennsylvania’s Failing Public Schools”
2011 National AP Achievement List from the College Board

The following Pennsylvania School Districts are on the 2011 College Board AP Achievement list; Pennsylvania had the third largest number of districts behind only California and Michigan:

Pennsylvania 2011 AP District of the Year Awards from the College Board

 School District
2010-11 Student Poverty Concentration
Abington SD
15.30
Avon Grove SD
15.91
Berwick Area SD
42.27%
Centennial SD
22.39%
Coatesville Area SD
38.10%
Colonial SD
14.15%
Cumberland Valley SD
11.53%
Delaware Valley SD
23.66%
Easton Area SD
38.97%
Great Valley SD
7.30%
Haverford Township SD
9.79%
Lower Dauphin SD
17.92%
Millcreek SD
32.26%
New Hope Solebury SD
2.97%
Northampton Area SD
20.77%
Penn-Trafford SD
12.00%
Perkiomen Valley SD
10.75%
Pine Richland SD
5.13%
Plum Borough SD
17.17%
Quaker Valley SD
14.88%
Riverview SD
30.32%
Souderton Area SD
12.65%
Tredyffrin-Easttown SD
4.16%
Upper Dublin SD
9.23%
Upper Moreland Township SD
18.25%
Upper St Clair Township SD
4.06%
Williamsport Area SD
62.50%


The AP Achievement List is not necessarily a register of the highest-performing AP districts — rather, it is composed of all districts that are simultaneously expanding opportunity and improving performance, so that even low-performing districts are included if they have been able to maintain or improve scores while expanding access. The list includes 388 school districts representing 43 states, with California’s 37 districts on the list representing the largest number of districts from a single state, followed by Michigan with 29 districts and Pennsylvania with 28 districts. Inclusion on the list is based on the following criteria:
·         Examination of three years of AP data, from 2008 to 2010
·         Increase in participation/access to AP by at least 4 percent in large districts, at least 7 percent in medium districts and at least 11 percent in small districts
·         A steady or increasing percentage of exams taken by African American, Hispanic/Latino and American Indian/Alaska Native students
·         Performance levels maintained or improved when comparing the percentage of exams scoring 3 or higher in 2010 to 2008
Additionally, school districts with an AP student population composed of 50 percent or more traditionally underrepresented minority students (African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian/Alaska Native) and/or low-income students have been noted on the Achievement List to highlight significant improvements in equity and quality among the nation’s historically underserved student populations.
“These districts are living proof that when access to AP is provided for the range and breadth of prepared and motivated students, districts can achieve even higher learning outcomes for their students — and the opportunity for so many more to earn college credit and placement — than when AP opportunities were restricted to a smaller segment of the high school population” said Trevor Packer, vice president of the Advanced Placement Program at the College Board.

The honor roll consists of the 388 U.S. public school districts that simultaneously achieved increases in access to AP®  courses for a broader number of  students and also maintained or improved the rate at which their AP students earned scores of 3 or higher on an AP Exam.





Pennsylvania’s Failing Public Schools”
2011 Washington Post High School Challenge (Formerly Newsweek Top Schools)



Behold the power of challenging all high school students — not just the A team
Washington Post By Jay Mathews, Published: May 19

I began ranking schools in 1998 on participation in AP and IB tests. Later, I added the CambridgeAdvanced International Certificate of Education exam to what I named the Challenge Index. The national list started that year in Newsweek, the local list in The Post. This year’s national ranking moved to The Post after The Washington Post Co. sold Newsweek last summer.

Info about the Washington Post High School Challenge (formerly Newsweek Top Schools)
Washington Post 2011 High School Challenge Pennsylvania Schools List























Jay Matthews' Washington Post 2011




Pennsylvania Schools




1
Philadelphia
86.3
14
3.521
2
Erie
52.8
28
2.925
3
Upper St. Clair
40.3
5
2.803
4
Philadelphia
38.4
48
2.733
5
Wyomissing

19
2.497
6
Gibsonia
44
6
1.994
7
Malvern
39.5
6
1.894
8
Kennett Square
49.4
2
1.85
9
Rosemont
35
10
1.845
10
Beaver Falls
26.6
27
1.841
11
Wyncote
36
12
1.72
12
Leetsdale
52.3
17
1.71
13
Huntingdon Valley
39.3
2
1.7
14
Hershey
37.2
10
1.628
15
Beaver
35.2
14
1.539
16
Erdenheim
36.1
12
1.537
17
Ardmore

8
1.465
18
Media
37.8
6
1.426
19
Radnor
46.8
6
1.371
20
Kennett Square
37
29
1.368
21
Hummelstown
27.1
10
1.366
22
Pittsburgh
45.5
9
1.364
23
Allison Park
36.1
7
1.284
24
Pittsburgh
12.9
17
1.21
25
State College
29.8
11
1.174
26
Pittsburgh
25.6
35
1.158
27
Newtown
45.6
3
1.152
28
Lansdale
23.3
17
1.14
29
Wexford
33.4
4
1.121
30
Doylestown
31.6
4
1.113
31
McDonald
23.1
12
1.078


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