Tuesday, June 19, 2018

PA Ed Policy Roundup June 19" AASA Issues Statement On Immigration


Daily postings from the Keystone State Education Coalition now reach more than 4050 Pennsylvania education policymakers – school directors, administrators, legislators, legislative and congressional staffers, Governor's staff, current/former PA Secretaries of Education, Wolf education transition team members, superintendents, school solicitors, principals, charter school leaders, PTO/PTA officers, parent advocates, teacher leaders, business leaders, faith-based organizations, labor organizations, education professors, members of the press and a broad array of P-16 regulatory agencies, professional associations and education advocacy organizations via emails, website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

These daily emails are archived and searchable at http://keystonestateeducationcoalition.org
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AASA Issues Statement On Immigration



Pennsylvania Education Leaders Press Conference Capitol Rotunda 1-2 pm Tuesday June 19th



All 4 Living Former First Ladies Decry Trump Border Policy That Separates Families
New York Times By Matt Stevens and Sarah Mervosh June 19, 2018
In the weeks since the Trump administration instituted a zero tolerance policy that seeks to criminally prosecute anyone who crosses the border unlawfully and effectively causes children to be separated from their families, criticism has poured in from advocacy groups, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle and a host of political luminaries who are no longer in office. Now, in the span of about 24 hours, all four living former first ladies have added their voices to the chorus of public critique, calling the practice “immoral,” “disgraceful” and a “humanitarian crisis.” Even the current first lady, Melania Trump, took the somewhat unusual step of issuing a statement that appeared to align somewhat with her predecessors, while also avoiding assigning partisan blame. “Mrs. Trump hates to see children separated from their families and hopes both sides of the aisle can finally come together to achieve successful immigration reform,” her office said in a statement on Sunday. “She believes we need to be a country that follows all laws, but also a country that governs with heart.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/19/us/politics/first-ladies-trump-family-separation.html

“Our nation’s public school superintendents and the schools they serve are legally required to educate the children that come through their doors. We are deeply concerned with recent steps that result in the separation of children and parents at the border.”
AASA Issues Statement On Immigration
Alexandria, Va. – June 18, 2018 – AASA,The School Superintendents Association, released the following statement in response to the forced separation of children and parents at the U.S. border. “Our nation’s public school superintendents and the schools they serve are legally required to educate the children that come through their doors. We are deeply concerned with recent steps that result in the separation of children and parents at the border. “Immigration policy is not easy, but we are deeply troubled by the purposeful and aggressive implementation of a policy that is widely recognized as flawed, one that separates young children from their parents in a world they do not know. AASA is an organization that serves and represents education professionals. And while we won’t claim expertise in immigration policy, the nation’s public school superintendents are experts in what can and does work for students and young children, and we know that the separation policy is harmful, traumatic, and stressful, and these effects may follow these children for the rest of their lives. “Policy can be tough and fair without being inhumane, and we urge the administration to immediately cease this intentionally cruel policy.” 
For additional questions, please contact Noelle Ellerson Ng, AASA associate executive director, policy and advocacy, at nellerson@aasa.org.
http://aasa.org/content.aspx?id=42666

Here's what nearly every Pa. congressman said about Donald Trump's brutal border policy
Penn Live By John L. Micek jmicek@pennlive.com Updated Jun 18, 2:48 PM; Posted Jun 18, 12:57 PM
President Donald Trump's White House continued Monday to falsely blame Democrats for its own hardline policy of separating families and children at the border. Meanwhile, bipartisan anger at the policy continued to build on Capitol Hill. Amidst all that, here's what most members of Pennsylvania's U.S. House delegation, and its two U.S. Senators, have to say about the debate. A quick inspection will reveal a pattern. Democrats have been vocally critical, while Trump's fellow Republicans have either been supportive or notably silent. In cases where we could not reach lawmakers for comment, we will update once we hear from them.
https://www.pennlive.com/opinion/2018/06/heres_what_every_pa_congressma.html#incart_2box_opinion

Barletta defends Trump’s family separation policy
Citizens Voice BY BORYS KRAWCZENIUK / PUBLISHED: JUNE 19, 2018
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta defended the Trump administration policy of separating children from their parents who enter the United States illegally from Mexico. Barletta, R-11, Hazleton, said Monday the policy amounts to enforcing federal law to deter illegal immigration. Illegal immigrants break the law and deserve the same treatment as citizens who commit other crimes in the United States and lose custody of their children, he said. “I’m not in favor of separating children from parents,” Barletta said in an interview. “But what I’m not in favor of is creating a separate law for people who come in to the country illegally with their family and American citizens who commit a crime in the United States and have to go through a criminal procedure.” Federal agents separated almost 2,000 children from their border-crossing parents between mid-April and the end of May, the administration said Friday.
http://www.citizensvoice.com/news/barletta-defends-trump-s-family-separation-policy-1.2351474

Pat Toomey on border separations: Problem has been 'exaggerated significantly'
Inquirer by Katherine Nails, Staff Writer  @katherinernails |  knails@phillynews.com Updated: JUNE 18, 2018 — 4:42 PM EDT
Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) appeared on Hugh Hewitt’s radio show Monday to discuss the separation of families at the U.S. border, saying he believes the problem has been “exaggerated significantly.” When Hewitt, a conservative radio host, defended the issue’s legitimacy, citing reports from the Wall Street Journal and MSNBC, Toomey — one of a number of Philadelphia-area lawmakers who has weighed in on the issue — followed up by stating that Congress should pass legislation to permit family-detention centers and that he was not an expert on the subject. “This is not my area of expertise, Hugh,” he said. “…Maybe this is happening with a higher frequency than I’ve been aware of, and it is certainly, it’s just not the right thing to be doing.” Toomey was not the only local politician to speak out about the detention centers. Area lawmakers across the political spectrum have voiced their opinions. Here’s what you need to know about the situation, and what local lawmakers have to say about it.
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/politics/border-control-immigration-family-separation-pat-toomey-reaction-lawmakers-20180618.html

A secret recording captures the sounds of crying children separated from parents at the border
Inquirer by Eli Rosenberg, Washington Post Updated: JUNE 18, 2018 — 11:19 PM EDT
The practice of separating children from their parents, a result of the Trump administration’s new hard-line immigration enforcement policy, has unfolded largely in the dark, separated from the public and restricted to the media. But on Monday, the nonprofit journalism organization ProPublica published what it said was a recording taken inside one of the facilities run by U.S. Customs and Border Protection where children taken from their parents are housed. The audio includes the sounds of a chorus of children sobbing and asking for their parents, some in what sounds like significant levels of distress. They call out “daddy!” and “mommy!” – in Spanish – repeatedly. Others sob so hard it seems they are gasping for air. In a country already driven by an emotional debate about immigration, the recording has landed with a thud, joining other reporting, photographs and documentation that have emerged in recent days showing how the hard right turn of federal immigration policy is playing out on a human scale along the border.
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/politics/a-secret-recording-captures-the-sounds-of-crying-children-separated-from-parents-at-the-border-20180618.html

Pennsylvania House panel set to vote on gun bills
Morning Call by Steve Esack Contact Reporter Call Harrisburg Bureau June 18, 2018
A high school in Parkland, Fla. A nightclub in Orlando. A concert in Las Vegas.
Three places where large mass shootings killed a combined 124 people since June 2016. Now, the Pennsylvania House is taking its first votes on a series of bills aimed at preventing mass shootings here. One bill would ban mechanisms that make semi-automatic triggers faster. Another would require criminal background checks on all firearms purchases. Three others deal with domestic abusers and mental illness. It’s unclear if there’s enough political support for any of the bills to pass the chamber, where a large bloc of lawmakers closely vets anything it sees as encroaching on the Second Amendment. Retiring Rep. Ron Marsico, R-Dauphin, doesn’t care. After conducting seven public hearings on gun bills, Marsico is calling for votes beginning at 9 a.m. in the House Judiciary Committee. The committee handles gun legislation in the House, and for years Marsico, as chairman, was accused by critics of sitting on bills that would tighten the state’s gun laws.
http://www.mcall.com/news/nationworld/pennsylvania/mc-nws-pennsylvania-gun-bill-votes-20180618-story.html

The NRA wants to scare lawmakers out of supporting reasonable gun control. Don't let it happen
Penn Live By John L. Micek  jmicek@pennlive.com Updated 7:59 AM; Posted 7:56 AM
Good Tuesday Morning, Fellow Seekers.
It's days like these that remind us of why it's nearly impossible for Pennsylvania to enact the kind of reasonable gun control measures that a majority of voters say they want their elected leaders to approve. With an election looming, the National Rifle Association is leaning hard on legislators to shoot down bills that would ban so-called 'bump stocks' and expand background checks to private gun sales. The House Judiciary Committee 
is scheduled to meet at 9 a.m. this morning in the House Majority Caucus Room to take up nine bills, many of them the product of days' worth of hearings the panel held on gun-control and safety measures this spring.

Among them is a measure sponsored by Rep. James R. Santora, R-Delaware, that would impose universal background checks on all gun purchases, including those at gun shows. In its email, the NRA warned that these "measures place undue burden on law-abiding gun owners when criminals, by definition, do not follow such laws."
https://www.pennlive.com/capitol-notebook/2018/06/the_nra_wants_to_scare_lawmake.html

The Rundown: State Senate Embraces Exam Alternatives
Reading Eagle, Pa. — Reading Eagle, Pa. June 18
Legislation that seeks to prevent the Keystone Exams from being a lone hurdle to graduation from high school in Pennsylvania passed the Senate Education Committee last week, to the applause of both the Pennsylvania School Boards Association and the president of the state's largest teachers union. Senate Bill 1095 seeks to revise the high school graduation requirement calling for students to pass the state-developed Keystone Exams in literature, algebra and biology -- a mandate the General Assembly has delayed twice and is now scheduled to take effect for the 2019-20 school year. The bill offers four options for alternatives to passing all three Keystone Exams to graduate, including a student's: achieving equivalent scores on alternative tests; winning acceptance to an apprenticeship program after graduation; and being able to demonstrate competency through evidence specific to career and technical education. "This proposal allows various assessments and pieces of evidence to be used to show proficiency rather than using Keystone Exams as the sole consideration of student success," PSBA Chief Executive Officer Nathan G. Mains said in a news release Wednesday. "The proposal appropriately recognizes the achievement of knowledge and skills relevant to students' individual career pathways."
http://start.att.net/news/read/category/politics/article/reading_eagle-the_rundown_state_senate_embraces_exam_alternative-tca

Future Ready Index: New state tool to evaluate schools to launch this fall
Citizens Voice by SARAH HOFIUS HALL / PUBLISHED: JUNE 17, 2018
In an effort to increase transparency and provide a better progress report on achievement, growth and other outcomes, the state plans to launch a new evaluation tool this fall. The Future Ready PA Index meets federal requirements and replaces the School Performance Profile system. The index comes after the Pennsylvania Department of Education received feedback from “thousands of stakeholders” on the best way to determine success and hold schools accountable, said Pedro A. Rivera, state secretary of education. “They were pretty clear,” he said. “They did not want to see a system of accountability tied to one single measure.” The index includes three main categories:
http://www.citizensvoice.com/news/new-state-tool-to-evaluate-schools-to-launch-this-fall-1.2350742#.Wyf6a5S5pP4.twitter

PA Department of Education: Future Ready Index Website
In looking at ways to create a more holistic school evaluation tool, the Pennsylvania Department of Education conducted dozens of feedback sessions to solicit recommendations from more than 1,000 stakeholders around a new measure. The proposed Future Ready PA Index will serve as Pennsylvania’s one-stop location for comprehensive information about school success, and will use a dashboard model to highlight how schools are performing and making progress on multiple indicators.
http://www.education.pa.gov/Pages/Future-Ready-PA.aspx

Philadelphia Charter School Performance Framework – District and Charter Ratings
Excellent Schools PA Website Posted 06.18.2018
The School District of Philadelphia’s Charter Schools Office (CSO) has multiple responsibilities, one of which is that the CSO “monitors performance and promotes high standards in Philadelphia’s charter schools while preserving charter school autonomy and protecting the rights of students and families.” As was described in a previous blog post (What if every Philadelphia school was held to the same quality standards?), the CSO is carrying out this duty by utilize the Charter School Performance Framework (Framework) to inform charter renewal decisions. In January of 2018 an updated Framework and FAQ were released. These documents detail the Academic, Organizational and Financial scoring system, and answers many of the question one may have regarding the application of the Framework. The School Reform Commission has decided the Framework is the standard by which charters are evaluated to determine whether or not a school is meeting the needs of students and should continue operating. Which is why we thought it would be interesting to apply the Framework to all public schools in Philadelphia. We ran this calculation using raw data from the 2017 School Progress Reports2017 Keystone Exam results, and generating similar school groups from the Peer Group Demographics released by the District’s Performance Office.
https://excellentschoolspa.org/2018/06/18/philadelphia-charter-school-performance-framework-district-charter-ratings/

Look up the average SAT score for every public high school in Pa.
By Sara K. Satullo ssatullo@lehighvalleylive.com, For lehighvalleylive.com Updated 6:49 AM; Posted 6:48 AM
Taking the SAT is a rite of passage for college-bound Pennsylvania high schoolers. Each year, the Pennsylvania Department of Education releases a list of the average SAT score for every public high school in the state.  We took a look at the 2017 average SAT scores -- the most recent available -- for students who were expected to graduate last year and compiled it into a search tool. The tool below allows you to compare the SAT score of any two Pennsylvania public high schools, including charter schools.  A perfect score is 1,600 -- 800 for reading and writing and 800 for math. Pennsylvania's average state score for 2017 was 1,032. Scores may not add up exactly due to rounding.
https://www.lehighvalleylive.com/education/index.ssf/2018/06/the_average_sat_score_for_every_public_high_school_in_pa.html#incart_river_index

“Collectively, we believe a curriculum oriented toward collaborative, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning will not only better prepare our students for college and their professional futures, but also result in more engaging programs for both students and faculty. We expect this approach will appeal to students’ innate curiosity, increase their motivation, and fuel their love of learning."
Rejecting AP Courses
Eight private schools in Washington area -- including St. Albans and Sidwell Friends -- announce they will stop offering Advanced Placement courses.
Inside Higher Ed By Scott Jaschik June 19, 2018
Eight elite private high schools in the Washington area this morning announced that they are dropping out of the Advanced Placement program. In a joint statement, they said that they were responding to "the diminished utility of AP courses and the desirability of developing our own advanced courses that more effectively address our students’ needs and interests. Collectively, we believe a curriculum oriented toward collaborative, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning will not only better prepare our students for college and their professional futures, but also result in more engaging programs for both students and faculty. We expect this approach will appeal to students’ innate curiosity, increase their motivation, and fuel their love of learning." The high schools making the announcement are institutions known for educating the children of the powerful of Washington. The schools are Georgetown Day, Holton-Arms, Landon, Maret, National Cathedral, Potomac, St. Albans and Sidwell Friends.
The joint statement says that the schools will phase out AP courses by 2022.
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/06/19/eight-private-high-schools-washington-area-are-dropping-out-ap-program

Bethlehem Area Superintendent: $281 million budget 'puts the money in the right places'
Jacqueline Palochko Contact Reporter Of The Morning Call June 18, 2018
The Bethlehem Area School Board passed a $281.3 million budget that raises taxes by 2.47 percent and adds American Sign Language to the high school curriculum, along with Spanish classes for elementary students. The board passed the budget 7-1 at its meeting Monday night. Director Tom Thomasik voted against it; Director Rogelio Ortiz was absent. After the meeting, Thomasik declined to explain his vote. The school district started budget talks earlier this year with a $10.7 million deficit, but was able to close that hole through cuts and borrowing from the fund balance. The tax millage rate will be 55.97 in Northampton County, and 18.37 in Lehigh County. Bethlehem Area straddles the two counties. Superintendent Joseph Roy praised the budget before it was voted on. He said the budget allows the district to continue to fund full-day kindergarten and the Reading By Grade 3 initiative the district has. The budget also continues the Project Lead the Way classes, a national nonprofit that develops STEM curriculum. “This budget is an investment in the district and in the community,” Roy said. “It really puts the money in the right places.”
http://www.mcall.com/news/education/mc-nws-bethlehem-school-board-20180618-story.html

Nazareth School Board passes budget with 2.3 percent tax hike
Kevin Duffy Special to The Morning Call June 18, 2018
The Nazareth Area School Board passed a budget that includes a tax increase for property owners in the district and a focus on student safety. The $88.8 million budget, representing a 4.82 percent increase over the current year, comes with a 2.3 percent increase in the real estate tax rate, or 1.23 mills more, taking the district to 54.49 mills overall. The increase means a homeowner with an average assessment of $70,500 will pay $86 more in property taxes next year, said Stuart Whiteleather, business administrator. The board voted 7-1 to approve the spending and tax plan, with Linda Stubits voting no. Jodi Mammana was absent. The district could have raised taxes by as much as 2.4 percent, or 1.28 mills, under the Act 1 index. The board was, in fact, looking at a 2.4 percent proposed increase as late as last week, before revisions to the spending plan, including a $7,500 reduction in legal consulting fees and $10,000 cuts to both the superintendent’s and facilities director’s budgets, were brought forth, Whiteleather said.
http://www.mcall.com/news/local/mc-nws-nazareth-school-district-budget-tax-hike-20180618-story.html

Salisbury OKs teachers contract with 2.5% raises
Margie Peterson Special to The Morning Call
Salisbury Township School Board last week approved a contract with the teachers union that grants raises of 2.5 percent each year of the four-year pact. The union, the Salisbury Education Association, which represents the districts’ approximately 135 teachers, approved the contract June 11, according to Salisbury Board President Frank Frankenfield. The school board’s Wednesday vote on the contract was 5-1, with George Gatanis voting no. Sam DeFrank was absent. Directors Carol Klinger and Audrey Frick abstained. Frick’s husband is a Salisbury teacher and Klinger is a retired teacher. The teachers will have one less work day, bringing the school year to 188 days. Medical coverage stays the same and there are no big changes in other aspects of the contract, Frankenfield said. The district and the union were in negotiations since January. The four-year pact goes into effect Sept. 1 and runs through Aug. 31, 2022.
http://www.mcall.com/news/education/mc-nws-salisbury-teachers-contract-20180614-story.html

Boyertown School Board cuts ‘pay-to-play’ fee in half
By Evan Brandt, The Mercury POSTED: 06/14/18, 6:56 AM EDT | UPDATED: 3 DAYS AGO
BOYERTOWN >> As the result of a 6-3 vote Tuesday, it is now less expensive to participate in extracurricular activities in the Boyertown Area School District. After devoting more debate to the topic than to a $118 million budget that will raise property taxes by 5.4 percent, the board voted to reduce the activity fee, which was raised last year to $200 per student, with a $400 per-family cap. The new fee, which applies to those who participate in music programs as well as athletics, will go back to $100 per student and a family cap of $300. Voting against the fee reduction were board members Clay Breece, Ruth Dierolf and Christine Neiman. The vote and discussion came at a Tuesday night meeting packed with major issues including the approval of a decision to demolish Memorial Stadium and build a new one; extend the interim superintendent’s contract; approve a one-year $1.2 million teacher contract; and preserve the expiring per capita tax. But it was the subject of the activity fee reduction that garnered the most discussion.
http://www.pottsmerc.com/article/MP/20180614/NEWS/180619871

PIAA making push to exclude high school athletics from sports gambling in Pennsylvania
Penn Live By Brian Linder | blinder@pennlive.com  on June 18, 2018 2:14 PM
Planning on placing a bet on a big-time high school game in Pennsylvania when the sports books open? Pump the brakes. At Monday’s meeting of the Pennsylvania Athletic Oversight Committee at the state capitol, PIAA executive director Bob Lombardi asked that the group “support our attempt to petition the Pennsylvania Gaming Board to exclude interscholastic activities.” Committee members, Rep. Robert Matzie (D-Ambridge), Rep. Gene DiGirolamo (R-Bucks) and Senator Jay Costa, all said they would support the PIAA in that motion. “As the author of the original sports betting legislation, I’ll tell you that was not our intent to have interscholastic athletics,” Matzie said. “If there’s something we need to do legislatively, or if it’s as simple as making our thoughts known to the gaming control board, I’d be happy to do that.”
http://highschoolsports.pennlive.com/news/article/-9124595218969229284/piaa-making-push-to-exclude-high-school-athletics-from-sports-gambling-in-pennsylvania/


Apply Now for EPLC's 2018-2019 PA Education Policy Fellowship Program!
Applications are available now for the 2018-2019 Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP).  The Education Policy Fellowship Program is sponsored in Pennsylvania by The Education Policy and Leadership Center (EPLC). 
With more than 500 graduates in its first eighteen years, this Program is a premier professional development opportunity for educators, state and local policymakers, advocates, and community leaders.  State Board of Accountancy (SBA) credits are available to certified public accountants.
Past participants include state policymakers, district superintendents and principals, school business officers, school board members, education deans/chairs, statewide association leaders, parent leaders, education advocates, and other education and community leaders. Fellows are typically sponsored by their employer or another organization. The Fellowship Program begins with a two-day retreat on September 13-14, 2018 and continues to graduation in June 2019.
Applications are being accepted now.
Click here to read more about the Education Policy Fellowship Program.
The application may be copied from the EPLC web site, but must be submitted by mail or scanned and e-mailed, with the necessary signatures of applicant and sponsor.
If you would like to discuss any aspect of the Fellowship Program and its requirements, please contact EPLC Executive Director Ron Cowell at 717-260-9900 or cowell@eplc.org.


Nominations for PSBA’s Allwein Advocacy Award due by July 16
PSBA Website May 14, 2018
The Timothy M. Allwein Advocacy Award was established in 2011 by the Pennsylvania School Boards Association and may be presented annually to the individual school director or entire school board to recognize outstanding leadership in legislative advocacy efforts on behalf of public education and students that are consistent with the positions in PSBA’s Legislative Platform. In addition to being a highly respected lobbyist, Timothy Allwein served to help our members be effective advocates in their own right. Many have said that Tim inspired them to become active in our Legislative Action Program and to develop personal working relationships with their legislators. The 2018 Allwein Award nomination process will begin on Monday, May 14, 2018. The application due date is July 16, 2018 in the honor of Tim’s birth date of July 16.
Download the Application

https://www.psba.org/2018/05/nominations-allwein-advocacy-award/

Join with EdVotersPA and PCCY for Capitol Caravan Days and fight for our public schools! When: 9:00-3:00 on June 12 or June 20 (your choice!)
Where: The Harrisburg Capitol
Why: To show state lawmakers that their constituents expect them to support public school students in the '18-19 budget

Education Voters of PA joining together with Pennsylvania Citizens for Children and Youth (PCCY) for a lobby day in Harrisburg. Join a team and meet with your state legislators and legislative leaders to talk about how the state can support K-12 students in the state budget.
Register Here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdrk24gH61bp7Zjy_JFpIELPYcEvXx05Ld4-_CPltQYyqLSPw/viewform

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD! Join the PA Principals Association, the PA Association of School Administrators and the PA Association of Rural and Small Schools for PA Education Leaders Advocacy Day at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, June 19, 2018, at the Capitol in Harrisburg, PA.  
A rally in support of public education and important education issues will be held on the Main Rotunda Steps from 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Visits with legislators will be conducted earlier in the day. More information will be sent via email, shared in our publications and posted on our website closer to the event.
To register, send an email to Dr. Joseph Clapper at clapper@paprincipals.org before Friday, June 8, 2018.
Click here to view the PA Education Leaders Advocacy Day 2018 Save The Date Flyer (INCLUDES EVENT SCHEDULE AND IMPORTANT ISSUES.) 

POWER 100% SCHOOL FUNDING Day of Action Wednesday, June 20th at 1 PM at the PA Capitol
On Wednesday, June 20th at 1 PM, students, parents, community activists, and faith leaders from different traditions will gather on the steps of the State Capitol Main Rotunda for POWER’s 100% SCHOOL FUNDING Day of Action to demand support for legislation to put 100% of the Commonwealth's Basic Education Budget through PA's Fair Funding Formula. We ask you to join us as we stand in solidarity with one another and continue demanding fair and fully funded education for Pennsylvania’s public school students. In addition to a large rally, we will march to Governor Tom Wolfe's office to pray for his support for 100% through the Formula. Join us as we hold meetings that day with our legislators asking each one to speak out in favor of POWER's 100% plan.

SAVE THE DATE for the 2018 PA Educational Leadership Summit - July 29-31 - State College, PA sponsored by the PA Principals Association, PASA, PAMLE and PASCD.  
This year's Summit will be held from July 29-31, 2018 at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel, State College, PA.

2nd Annual National Black Male Educators Convening, Oct. 12-14, Philly
Teacher diversity works. Increasing the number of Black male educators in our nation’s teacher corps will improve education for all our students, especially for African-American boys.Today Black men represent only two percent of teachers nationwide. This is a national problem that demands a national response. Come participate in the 2nd National Black Male Educators Convening to advance policy solutions, learn from one another, and fight for social justice. All are welcome. Register to attend. Nominate a speaker. Propose a workshop. Sponsor the event.

Save the Dates PASA/PSBA School Leadership Conference – Hershey, Oct. 17-19, 2018 
Mark your calendar! The Delegate Assembly will take place Friday, Oct. 19, 2018, at 2:30 p.m.
Housing now open!

Our Public Schools Our Democracy: Our Fight for the Future
NPE / NPE Action 5th Annual National Conference
October 20th - 21st, 2018 Indianapolis, Indiana
We are delighted to let you know that you can purchase your discounted Early Bird ticket to register for our annual conference starting today. Purchase your ticket here.
Early Bird tickets will be on sale until May 30 or until all are sold out, so don't wait.  These tickets are a great price--$135. Not only do they offer conference admission, they also include breakfast and lunch on Saturday, and brunch on Sunday. Please don't forget to register for your hotel room. We have secured discounted rates on a limited basis. You can find that link here. Finally, if you require additional financial support to attend, we do offer some scholarships based on need. Go here and fill in an application. We will get back to you as soon as we can. Please join us in Indianapolis as we fight for the public schools that our children and communities deserve. Don't forget to get your Early Bird ticket here. We can't wait to see you.


Any comments contained herein are my comments, alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of any other person or organization that I may be affiliated with.


Monday, June 18, 2018

PA Ed Policy Roundup June 18: SB 551 Could Save Pennsylvania’s 500 School Districts Up to $400 million Per Year on Tuition Payments to Chronically Failing Cyber Charters


Daily postings from the Keystone State Education Coalition now reach more than 4050 Pennsylvania education policymakers – school directors, administrators, legislators, legislative and congressional staffers, Governor's staff, current/former PA Secretaries of Education, Wolf education transition team members, superintendents, school solicitors, principals, charter school leaders, PTO/PTA officers, parent advocates, teacher leaders, business leaders, faith-based organizations, labor organizations, education professors, members of the press and a broad array of P-16 regulatory agencies, professional associations and education advocacy organizations via emails, website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

These daily emails are archived and searchable at http://keystonestateeducationcoalition.org
Follow us on Twitter at @lfeinberg

SB 551 Could Save Pennsylvania’s 500 School Districts Up to $400 million Per Year on Tuition Payments to Chronically Failing Cyber Charters


Family separation policy starts dividing Republicans
Inquirer by JILL COLVIN, The Associated Press Updated: JUNE 18, 2018 — 5:29 AM EDT
WASHINGTON (AP) - The emotional policy of separating children from their parents is also starting to divide Republicans and their allies as Democrats turn up the pressure.
Former first lady Laura Bush called the policy "cruel" and "immoral" while GOP Sen. Susan Collins expressed concern about it and a former adviser to President Donald Trump said he thought the issue was going to hurt the president at some point. Religious groups, including some conservative ones, are protesting. Mrs. Bush made some of the strongest comments yet about the policy from the Republican side of the aisle. "I live in a border state. I appreciate the need to enforce and protect our international boundaries, but this zero-tolerance policy is cruel. It is immoral. And it breaks my heart," she wrote in a guest column for the Washington Post Sunday. She compared it to the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, which she called "one of the most shameful episodes in U.S. history." Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine said she favors tighter border security, but expressed deep concerns about the child separation policy.
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/politics/20180618_ap_8e35d6ce73e74227983312e4264f8594.html

Hundreds of children wait in Border Patrol facility in Texas
Trib Live by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS | Monday, June 18, 2018, 6:57 a.m.
McALLEN, Texas — Inside an old warehouse in South Texas, hundreds of children wait in a series of cages created by metal fencing. One cage had 20 children inside. Scattered about are bottles of water, bags of chips and large foil sheets intended to serve as blankets. One teenager told an advocate who visited that she was helping care for a young child she didn't know because the child's aunt was somewhere else in the facility. She said she had to show others in her cell how to change the girl's diaper. The U.S. Border Patrol on Sunday allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern U.S. border, responding to new criticism and protests over the Trump administration's “zero tolerance” policy and resulting separation of families.
http://triblive.com/usworld/world/13772663-74/hundreds-of-children-wait-in-border-patrol-facility-in-texas

Local clergy to join rally to draw attention to inequitable education funding
Lancaster Online by EARLE CORNELIUS | Staff Writer Jun 17, 2018
On Wednesday, local religious leaders will join students, parents and community activists as they gather on the steps of the main rotunda at the state Capitol in support of full funding for education in Pennsylvania. The “100% for All” rally is sponsored by powerinterfaith.org, an independent organization representing 50 congregations in southeastern and central Pennsylvania. The purpose of the rally is to draw the Legislature’s attention to inequities in school funding across the commonwealth. While the disparity in funding between rural and suburban districts has been known for some time, researchers at the Education Law Center and Philadelphia Organized to Witness Empower and Rebuild found that poverty is a factor statewide in determining how much aid per student a school district gets, but it is actually less of a predictor than race. David Mosenkis, a data researcher and volunteer who put together one of the studies last year for POWER, was among the first to see the connection. He said what the data show “is horrifying.” “On average, the whitest districts get thousands of dollars more than their fair share for each student, while the least white districts get thousands less for each student than their fair share,” he wrote. As part of a video presentation, Mosenkis points out that the School District of Lancaster is underfunded by $40 million. Greg Carey, a professor at Lancaster Theological Seminary, will be among those attending the rally. He said he was approached by seminary alumni in the Philadelphia area who are part of POWER.
https://lancasteronline.com/features/faith_values/local-clergy-to-join-rally-to-draw-attention-to-inequitable/article_ef3cecda-70ca-11e8-b01c-67c4fa6242a4.html

Indiana’s Virtual Charters: “How Long Do We Let Them Fail”?
Diane Ravitch’s Blog By dianeravitch June 15, 2018 //
This is a refreshing development. Republican legislators in Indiana are asking whether it is time to pull the plug on failing virtual charter schools. “As a group of state officials convene for the first time Tuesday to examine virtual charter schools, two prominent Indiana Republican lawmakers are calling for the state to intervene in the dismal performance of the schools. ““Whatever we’re doing is not working, because I don’t see where they’re improving,” said Ryan Mishler, chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee, adding, “With a virtual, if you’re failing so many years in a row, maybe we need to look at how long do we let them fail before we say you can’t operate.” “Mishler and House education chair Bob Behning told Chalkbeat that the oversight of virtual charter schools needs to be addressed, whether through changes to state law or action by the Indiana State Board of Education.
https://dianeravitch.net/2018/06/15/indianas-virtual-charters-how-long-do-we-let-them-fail/

“In 2016, the National Association of Charter School Authorizers and the national charter lobbying group 50CAN released a report on cyber charters, which found that compared to traditional public school students, full-time cyber students have poor academic growth. Overall, cyber students make no significant gains in math and less than half the gains in reading compared to their peers in traditional public schools, this report found.”
Pa. cyber charters consistently receive poor academic scores
Several states cracked down on cyber charters this school year, but Pennsylvania was not among them
The notebook by 
Greg Windle June 14 — 4:40 pm, 2018
No cyber charter school in Pennsylvania have ever received a passing academic score from the state, and very few have come close, according to information recently highlighted in a report from the office of Democratic State Rep. James Roebuck of Philadelphia. Roebuck and other House Democrats have assembled a package of bills that would further regulate charters by reforming how they use reserve funds, rules for leasing buildings, special education payments, contracting, the teacher evaluation system, disclosure in advertising, school building closures, and the transfer of school records. The package would not single out cybers, but other legislation has been introduced that would reduce their per-student reimbursement.  Pennsylvania has 13 cyber charters enrolling more than 34,000 students, or 10 percent of all the cyber students in the country. These schools are authorized not by local districts, but by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. But districts must send per-pupil payments to cyber charters for each local student they enroll, and the payments are the same as for brick-and-mortar charters, even though cybers have fewer expenses. This has proven frustrating not only to the districts and other proponents of traditional public schools, but to several groups that favor school choice and charters.
http://thenotebook.org/articles/2018/06/14/pennsylvanias-cyber-charters-consistently-recieve-poor-academic-scores/


Blogger comment: No school board authorized any of Pennsylvania’s existing cyber charter schools. Cyber education options are available through school districts and intermediate units at significant savings compared to cyber tuition.
SB 551 Could Save Pennsylvania’s 500 School Districts Up to $400 million Per Year on Tuition Payments to Chronically Failing Cyber Charters

(a.1)  If a public school district offers a cyber-based program equal in scope and content to an existing publicly chartered cyber charter school and a student in that district attends a cyber charter school instead of the district's cyber-based program, the school district shall not be required to provide funding to pay for the student's attendance at a cyber charter school.
http://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/billInfo/billInfo.cfm?sYear=2017&sInd=0&body=S&type=B&bn=0551

African-American teachers push messages of affirmation, success at Philadelphia school
"I’ve been that child under the desk crying because my father wasn’t around," said one African-American teacher.
NBC News by Ron Allen and Leah Smith / Jun.16.2018 / 3:29 PM ET / Updated Jun.16.2018 / 7:43 PM ET
PHILADELPHIA — "You're great!" That's what every student hears from teacher Herman Douglas when they enter his seventh-grade class at Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary School in a neighborhood of North Philadelphia plagued with crime, violence and poverty. "I'm great," each student responds. Douglas’ strong positive message is meant to counter the negativity so many students pass by in the streets on their way to school. He also bestows titles on his students, referring them as “king” and “queen" as reminders that they're descendants of African royalty. In addition to Douglas, 12 other African-American male educators work at this school — that's nearly 30 percent of the staff at a school where the students are primarily black and Hispanic. That number stands in contrast to the rest of the nation, where only 2 percent of teachers are African-American men.
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/african-american-teachers-push-messages-affirmation-success-philadelphia-school-n883661

Judge: Thackston charter must close at the end of June
York Dispatch Published 9:02 a.m. ET June 15, 2018 | Updated 4:21 p.m. ET June 15, 2018
A York County judge says Helen Thackston Charter School must close by the end of the month. York County Common Please Judge Richard K. Renn ruled Friday that Thackston must take all step to surrender its charter and close by the end of June. The ruling came at the end of a day of testimony in a nonjury trial between Thackston and the York City School District.
Check back for more on this breaking story.
https://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/education/2018/06/15/live-thackston-charter-york-city-school-district-court-trial/704493002/

“Wentzel outlined reasons that are causing increased costs for the district, including $1,092,845 in additional pension costs due to the increasing employer (district) share that shows a 6.55 percent increase.”
Ridley schools OK new budget with a tax increase
Delco Times By Barbara Ormsby, Times Correspondent POSTED: 06/15/18, 8:32 PM EDT
RIDLEY TOWNSHIP >> The Ridley School Board gave final approval at its June meeting to a final 2018-2019 budget listing expenditures of $107,579,727, which is $27,727 more than the proposed budget adopted last month by the board. The real estate millage rate will increase by 0.83 mills for a total millage rate of 40.73 mills, or $4.07 for each $100 of assessed property value. The millage increase means an increase of $84 for a house assessed at the district average of $100,000. District Superintendent Lee Ann Wentzel noted in part that local revenue will increase because interest earnings are going up due to changing investment rates. The new budget also reflects an overall debt service decrease of 2.72 percent. There is also an increase of $3,890,203 in the district’s total taxable assessed value. “Additional revenue streams will be continued through the annual technology fee for families and the resale/recycle collections generated in the technology plan,” Wentzel said in her budget report. “... we continue to aggressively apply for alternative funding streams through grant opportunities. We are pleased to report that our efforts are having positive results. We are seeking additional large sum grants for the 2018-2019 school year.”
http://www.delcotimes.com/general-news/20180615/ridley-schools-ok-new-budget-with-a-tax-increase

Letters to the Editor: Garnet Valley not alone in budget blues
Deborah Gordon Klehr, Executive Director, Education Law Center POSTED: 06/15/18, 8:36 PM EDT | UPDATED: 5 HRS AGO
To the Times::L Your recent article about the challenges Garnet Valley School District faces in finalizing a budget highlights among the factors driving school costs are mandated expenditures in special education (Taxes and spending rise in proposed Garnet Valley schools budget, May 17, 2018). Garnet Valley is not alone. School districts across the region and the state need more special education dollars to ensure that the 270,000 Pennsylvania students with disabilities receive the high quality inclusive education they need and to which they are legally entitled. A 2009 study showed that there was a $380 million funding gap for special education across the Commonwealth, and we know that gap has grown. Inadequate funding has resulted in an insufficient number of staff to support our students as well as deep cuts to critical resources and services that these students need to make educational progress. Governor Wolf proposes putting $20 million more for special education in the next state budget. That will help but the legislature should increase that amount further in their final state budget to get children the support they need.
http://www.delcotimes.com/opinion/20180615/letters-to-the-editor-garnet-valley-not-alone-in-budget-blues

Easton Area hopes math x 2 = better outcomes for sixth graders
Morning Call by Michelle Merlin Contact Reporter June 18, 2018
Easton Area’s sixth-graders should know the answer to the equation 2 x 43 + 4.
That’s how many minutes they’ll be spending in math next year, when the school district gives its youngest middle schoolers a double period in math (plus four minutes in passing time between the two periods). The change is part of an effort to improve math performance, smooth the transition between elementary school and middle school and create a more supportive environment for students, said Michael Koch, district director of assessment and accountability. It also allows Easton’s sixth-grade math students to use a model called station rotation in which they break into groups and spend part of the class with the teacher, part working by themselves (usually with an iPad) and part working in a group. School districts around the Lehigh Valley are increasingly using the station rotation model in their classrooms at different age levels and subject areas. Pleasant Valley, Stroudsburg Area, Bethlehem Area and East Penn school districts are among those in the area that have begun using or are implementing station rotation learning.
Easton is adding teachers and removing study halls to make the double blocks possible.
http://www.mcall.com/news/education/mc-nws-easton-area-double-sixth-grade-math-20180611-story.html

Salisbury OKs teachers contract with 2.5% raises
Margie Peterson Special to The Morning Call June 18, 2018
Salisbury Township School Board last week approved a contract with the teachers union that grants raises of 2.5 percent each year of the four-year pact. he union, the Salisbury Education Association, which represents the districts’ approximately 135 teachers, approved the contract June 11, according to Salisbury Board President Frank Frankenfield. The school board’s Wednesday vote on the contract was 5-1, with George Gatanis voting no. Sam DeFrank was absent. Directors Carol Klinger and Audrey Frick abstained. Frick’s husband is a Salisbury teacher and Klinger is a retired teacher. The teachers will have one less work day, bringing the school year to 188 days. Medical coverage stays the same and there are no big changes in other aspects of the contract, Frankenfield said.
http://www.mcall.com/news/education/mc-nws-salisbury-teachers-contract-20180614-story.html

Downingtown school board adopts $220M budget for 2018-19
By Ginger Dunbar, Daily Local News POSTED: 06/17/18, 5:39 AM EDT | UPDATED: 20 HRS AGO
EAST CALN >> Downingtown school board members approved Wednesday the 2018-19 budget of $220 million without a tax increase. School board members approved the $220,629,805 budget in an 8-1 vote without discussion. Jaime Mehler dissented. School board members had approved of the preliminary budget last month. This is the sixth consecutive year that a Downingtown budget has been approved without a property tax increase. The 2018-2019 Real Estate Tax Millage remains at 27.182 mills. A mill is equal to $1 for each $1,000 of assessed property value. During prior discussions of the budget, Downingtown Superintendent Emilie Lonardi thanked the administration, school board members and others, and said the district will continue to provide students with a top-notch education. The Downingtown Area School District is the largest school district in Chester County and has 16 schools. District officials noted that the budget is fiscally responsible as they continue to plan initiatives such as rebuilding Uwchlan Hills Elementary School, updating security measures and completing the one-to-one device initiative in K-12.
http://www.dailylocal.com/general-news/20180617/downingtown-school-board-adopts-220m-budget-for-2018-19

Lack of high-quality pre-k hampers kids, communities, economy| Opinion
By Express-Times guest columnist Timothy Fallon Updated Jun 17, 8:01 AM
Timothy Fallon is the CEO of PBS39, the Greater Lehigh Valley's public media station. Visit www.paearlylearning.com for an April 2018 ELIC brief on the critical need for high-quality child care. 
In September 2015 I was asked by Gov. Tom  Wolf to join the non-partisan Pennsylvania Early Learning Investment Commission. I felt this was in direct alignment with the educational mission of PBS39.  Since then I have learned about the power of investing in the care and education of young children and have been gratified to see Pennsylvania's commitment to doing so grow.  Still, we can and must do more to realize the individual potential of every child and secure a prosperous future for our region and the commonwealth. Every child is born with innate talents. The question is how, and whether, those talents are unleashed and nurtured. Potential is like a flower that requires sun and water before it can bloom. Give a child the tools and the environment that power imagination, and their talents blossom. Even if scientists hadn't discovered the remarkable growth occurring in the brain from birth to age 5, we would know every moment offers a precious learning experience. In those years, children grow so quickly, learning to walk, speak, and interact with the people around them. Their little brains are hard at work. We know from research that each interaction sparks neural development that builds the pathways for lifetimes of learning, social functioning, and success.
https://www.lehighvalleylive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2018/06/lack_of_high-quality_pre-k_ham.html#incart_river_index


“This story about school segregation was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education, and The Investigative Fund, a newsroom for independent journalists, in partnership with NBC Nightly News/NBCNews.com. Emmanuel Felton is a staff writer at The Hechinger Report and an Ida B. Wells Fellow with The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute.”
Nearly 750 charter schools are whiter than the nearby district schools
Loose laws let scores of charters create policies that favor white students
Hechinger Report by EMMANUEL FELTON June 17, 2018 This story also appeared in NBC News and The Investigative Fund
GREENSBORO, Ga. — This was clearly no ordinary public school.
Parents of prospective students converged on Lake Oconee Academy for an open house on a bright but unseasonably cold March afternoon for northern Georgia. A driveway circling a landscaped pond led them to the school’s main hall. The tan building had the same luxury-lodge feel as the nearby Ritz-Carlton resort. Parents oohed and aahed as Jody Worth, the upper school director, ushered them through the campus. Nestled among gated communities, golf courses and country clubs, the school felt like an oasis of opportunity in a county of haves and have-nots, where nearly half of all children live in poverty while others live in multimillion-dollar lakeside houses. The school’s halls and classrooms are bright and airy, with high ceilings and oversize windows looking out across the lush landscape. There is even a terrace on which students can work on warm days. After a guide pointed out several science labs, the tour paused at the “piano lab.” The room holds 25 pianos, 10 of them donated by residents of the nearby exclusive communities. The guide also noted that starting in elementary school, all students take Spanish, art and music classes. The high school, which enrolls less than 200 students, has been able to offer as many as 17 Advanced Placement courses. Stunned, one mother, who was considering moving her family from suburban Atlanta to the area, asked how the school could afford it all. Lake Oconee’s amenities are virtually unheard of in rural Georgia; and because it is a public school, they are all available at the unbeatable price of free.
http://hechingerreport.org/nearly-750-charter-schools-are-whiter-than-the-nearby-district-schools/

Standardized Testing Battle in Seattle: Union votes for a complete moratorium on all standardized tests!
Jesse Hagopian’s Blog ON JUNE 14, 2018 BY 
I am bursting with pride for my union. The Seattle Education Association voted at this week’s Representative Assembly to support a resolution calling for a moratorium on all standardized testing!  This vote comes in a long line of organizing and opposition to high-stakes testing in Seattle. In 2013, the teachers at Garfield High School voted unanimously to refuse to administer the MAP test.  The boycott spread to several other schools in Seattle.  When the superintendent threatened the boycotting teachers with a 10 day suspension without pay, none of the teachers backed down.  At the end of the year, because of the overwhelming solidarity from parents, teachers, and students around the country, not only were no teachers disciplined, but the superintended announced that the MAP test would no longer be required for Seattle’s high schools.  In the subsequent years we have seen the movement continue to develop with Nathan Hale High School achieving a 100% opt out rate of the junior class of the Smarter Balance test in 2015, with some 60,000 families opting their kids out of the common core test around Washington State.
https://iamaneducator.com/2018/06/14/standardized-testing-battle-in-seattle-union-votes-for-a-complete-moratorium-on-all-standardized-tests/

“The Walton family—through personal campaign contributions, their non-profit private foundation and a political affiliate group—are leading supporters of the charter school movement in America. Charter schools are run privately but get public dollars to educate students whose families choose to enroll them there instead of traditional neighborhood schools. The Waltons are also prominent supporters of giving scholarship vouchers funded by tax credits to students going to private schools.”
Walmart Heirs Deny Involvement in Ga. Governor's Race After School Choice Comments Surface
Education Week By The Associated Press June 15, 2018
Representatives of the Walmart company heirs deny any involvement in the Georgia governor's race after a candidate was secretly recorded saying he backed a school choice law because campaign money from the family's non-profit foundation was at stake. Republican Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle admits making the remarks that surfaced in the past week. His campaign issued a statement Friday calling it "old news" that stemmed from a "purely political conversation" Cagle had in his campaign office. Cagle is heard saying he supported a bill in the recent legislative session expanding tax credit vouchers for private schools because millions of dollars in Walton foundation money were at stake in the gubernatorial race. "The words that Casey used in that secret recording do not reflect his feelings about the legislation that passed. He was a strong supporter and led to pass it," said Scott Binkley, his campaign manager.
https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/06/15/walmart-heirs-deny-involvement-in-georgia_ap.html


Apply Now for EPLC's 2018-2019 PA Education Policy Fellowship Program!
Applications are available now for the 2018-2019 Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP).  The Education Policy Fellowship Program is sponsored in Pennsylvania by The Education Policy and Leadership Center (EPLC). 
With more than 500 graduates in its first eighteen years, this Program is a premier professional development opportunity for educators, state and local policymakers, advocates, and community leaders.  State Board of Accountancy (SBA) credits are available to certified public accountants.
Past participants include state policymakers, district superintendents and principals, school business officers, school board members, education deans/chairs, statewide association leaders, parent leaders, education advocates, and other education and community leaders. Fellows are typically sponsored by their employer or another organization. The Fellowship Program begins with a two-day retreat on September 13-14, 2018 and continues to graduation in June 2019.
Applications are being accepted now.
Click here to read more about the Education Policy Fellowship Program.
The application may be copied from the EPLC web site, but must be submitted by mail or scanned and e-mailed, with the necessary signatures of applicant and sponsor.
If you would like to discuss any aspect of the Fellowship Program and its requirements, please contact EPLC Executive Director Ron Cowell at 717-260-9900 or cowell@eplc.org.


Nominations for PSBA’s Allwein Advocacy Award due by July 16
PSBA Website May 14, 2018
The Timothy M. Allwein Advocacy Award was established in 2011 by the Pennsylvania School Boards Association and may be presented annually to the individual school director or entire school board to recognize outstanding leadership in legislative advocacy efforts on behalf of public education and students that are consistent with the positions in PSBA’s Legislative Platform. In addition to being a highly respected lobbyist, Timothy Allwein served to help our members be effective advocates in their own right. Many have said that Tim inspired them to become active in our Legislative Action Program and to develop personal working relationships with their legislators. The 2018 Allwein Award nomination process will begin on Monday, May 14, 2018. The application due date is July 16, 2018 in the honor of Tim’s birth date of July 16.
Download the Application

https://www.psba.org/2018/05/nominations-allwein-advocacy-award/

Join with EdVotersPA and PCCY for Capitol Caravan Days and fight for our public schools! When: 9:00-3:00 on June 12 or June 20 (your choice!)
Where: The Harrisburg Capitol
Why: To show state lawmakers that their constituents expect them to support public school students in the '18-19 budget

Education Voters of PA joining together with Pennsylvania Citizens for Children and Youth (PCCY) for a lobby day in Harrisburg. Join a team and meet with your state legislators and legislative leaders to talk about how the state can support K-12 students in the state budget.
Register Here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdrk24gH61bp7Zjy_JFpIELPYcEvXx05Ld4-_CPltQYyqLSPw/viewform

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD! Join the PA Principals Association, the PA Association of School Administrators and the PA Association of Rural and Small Schools for PA Education Leaders Advocacy Day at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, June 19, 2018, at the Capitol in Harrisburg, PA.  
A rally in support of public education and important education issues will be held on the Main Rotunda Steps from 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Visits with legislators will be conducted earlier in the day. More information will be sent via email, shared in our publications and posted on our website closer to the event.
To register, send an email to Dr. Joseph Clapper at clapper@paprincipals.org before Friday, June 8, 2018.
Click here to view the PA Education Leaders Advocacy Day 2018 Save The Date Flyer (INCLUDES EVENT SCHEDULE AND IMPORTANT ISSUES.) 

POWER 100% SCHOOL FUNDING Day of Action Wednesday, June 20th at 1 PM at the PA Capitol
On Wednesday, June 20th at 1 PM, students, parents, community activists, and faith leaders from different traditions will gather on the steps of the State Capitol Main Rotunda for POWER’s 100% SCHOOL FUNDING Day of Action to demand support for legislation to put 100% of the Commonwealth's Basic Education Budget through PA's Fair Funding Formula. We ask you to join us as we stand in solidarity with one another and continue demanding fair and fully funded education for Pennsylvania’s public school students. In addition to a large rally, we will march to Governor Tom Wolfe's office to pray for his support for 100% through the Formula. Join us as we hold meetings that day with our legislators asking each one to speak out in favor of POWER's 100% plan.

SAVE THE DATE for the 2018 PA Educational Leadership Summit - July 29-31 - State College, PA sponsored by the PA Principals Association, PASA, PAMLE and PASCD.  
This year's Summit will be held from July 29-31, 2018 at the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel, State College, PA.

2nd Annual National Black Male Educators Convening, Oct. 12-14, Philly
Teacher diversity works. Increasing the number of Black male educators in our nation’s teacher corps will improve education for all our students, especially for African-American boys.Today Black men represent only two percent of teachers nationwide. This is a national problem that demands a national response. Come participate in the 2nd National Black Male Educators Convening to advance policy solutions, learn from one another, and fight for social justice. All are welcome. Register to attend. Nominate a speaker. Propose a workshop. Sponsor the event.

Save the Dates PASA/PSBA School Leadership Conference – Hershey, Oct. 17-19, 2018 
Mark your calendar! The Delegate Assembly will take place Friday, Oct. 19, 2018, at 2:30 p.m.
Housing now open!

Our Public Schools Our Democracy: Our Fight for the Future
NPE / NPE Action 5th Annual National Conference
October 20th - 21st, 2018 Indianapolis, Indiana
We are delighted to let you know that you can purchase your discounted Early Bird ticket to register for our annual conference starting today. Purchase your ticket here.
Early Bird tickets will be on sale until May 30 or until all are sold out, so don't wait.  These tickets are a great price--$135. Not only do they offer conference admission, they also include breakfast and lunch on Saturday, and brunch on Sunday. Please don't forget to register for your hotel room. We have secured discounted rates on a limited basis. You can find that link here. Finally, if you require additional financial support to attend, we do offer some scholarships based on need. Go here and fill in an application. We will get back to you as soon as we can. Please join us in Indianapolis as we fight for the public schools that our children and communities deserve. Don't forget to get your Early Bird ticket here. We can't wait to see you.


Any comments contained herein are my comments, alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of any other person or organization that I may be affiliated with.