Tuesday, November 13, 2018

PA Ed Policy Roundup Nov. 13: Study: Having Just One Black Teacher Can Up Black Students' Chances of Going to College


Daily postings from the Keystone State Education Coalition now reach more than 4050 Pennsylvania education policymakers – school directors, administrators, legislators, legislative and congressional staffers, Governor's staff, current/former PA Secretaries of Education, Wolf education transition team members, superintendents, school solicitors, principals, charter school leaders, PTO/PTA officers, parent advocates, teacher leaders, business leaders, faith-based organizations, labor organizations, education professors, members of the press and a broad array of P-16 regulatory agencies, professional associations and education advocacy organizations via emails, website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

These daily emails are archived and searchable at http://keystonestateeducationcoalition.org
Follow us on Twitter at @lfeinberg

Study: Having Just One Black Teacher Can Up Black Students' Chances of Going to College



PA Schools Work Summit Meetings Saturday Nov. 17th 9 to noon
Hundreds of local school and community leaders will come together on Nov. 17, to lead the fight for greater state investment in public education. #TheSummit will be held in seven locations across Pennsylvania from 9-noon on Saturday Nov. 17.



Election Round 2: Pa. legislators to select new (or old) leaders
Inquirer by Angela Couloumbis and Liz Navratil, Updated: November 12, 2018- 9:45 AM
HARRISBURG — When it comes to choosing new leaders in Pennsylvania's legislature, the more things change, apparently, the more they stay the same. Lawmakers will return to the Capitol this week to vote for leaders who control everything from which bills are brought to a floor vote to how many staffers rank-and-file members are assigned. While discussions remain fluid, few expect a seismic shake-up in either House or Senate leadership ranks — this despite last week's midterm election, which shifted the makeup of both chambers. Democrats are getting a crop of younger and more progressive members — many of them women – elected largely by voters from Philadelphia and its surrounding counties or Pittsburgh. And though Republicans will still hold majorities in both chambers, they suffered some crushing losses Tuesday, leaving them with a more conservative membership.
http://www2.philly.com/philly/news/politics/state/election-results-pa-legislature-leadership-contests-20181112.html

Study: Having Just One Black Teacher Can Up Black Students' Chances of Going to College
Education Week Teacher Beat Blog By Madeline Will on November 12, 2018 4:17 PM
If a black student has just one or two black teachers in elementary school, that student is significantly more likely to enroll in college, a new Johns Hopkins University study has found.  Black students who had just one black teacher by 3rd grade were 13 percent more likely to enroll in college, while those who had two black teachers were 32 percent more likely, the study found. These findings are a continuation of the 2017 study that found that a low-income black student's probability of dropping out of high school is reduced by 29 percent if he or she has one black teacher in grades 3-5.  The new study was released in conjunction with another study (from much of the same team of researchers) finding that teachers' beliefs about a student's college potential can become self-fulfilling prophecies. The study found that black teachers are more likely than white teachers to have higher expectations for black students. Both studies were published as working papers by the National Bureau of Economic Research.  "There are these frustratingly persistent attainment gaps between the races, and we want to close these gaps," said co-author Nicholas Papageorge, an assistant professor of economics at Johns Hopkins. These gaps should be closed because of the inherent inequity, Papageorge said, but also because it's costly for a society to have large swaths of its population not attend college. College enrollment among black young adults lags behind that of white, Asian, and Hispanic students, according to federal data.
http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/teacherbeat/2018/11/black_teachers_key_black_students_college_enrollment.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

State Rep. Bryan Cutler could get promotion to House majority leader Tuesday
Lancaster Online by SAM JANESCH | Staff Writer November 12, 2018
When state lawmakers return to Harrisburg on Tuesday to elect their leaders for the new two-year session, a southern Lancaster County legislator will be vying for one of the top spots in the House. State Rep. Bryan Cutler, a Peach Bottom Republican, will be considered by his colleagues in the GOP Caucus for the chamber’s second-highest position — majority leader. If selected during the private caucus vote, he would become the first Lancaster lawmaker to serve in one of the House’s top two positions since Aaron B. Hess had stints as majority leader and speaker in the 1920s. Cutler, 43, has represented the 100th Legislative District in southern Lancaster County since 2007 and spent the last four years as majority whip. That leadership role is often a stepping stone to the majority leader position, which would put Cutler in a spot to have a significant influence over the House’s policy agenda and budget negotiations.
https://lancasteronline.com/news/politics/state-rep-bryan-cutler-could-get-promotion-to-house-majority/article_855a58aa-e6a6-11e8-aa38-a77624ded660.html

Stop giving Wall Street a cut of our pensions | Opinion
Commentary by Joe Torsella, For The Inquirer Posted: November 12, 2018 - 9:45 AM
Joe Torsella is treasurer of Pennsylvania.
Pat worked for more than three decades as a nurse and educator. First as a school nurse, and then in a state hospital, she took care of the developmentally disabled and provided comfort and support for their families. She worked hard, eventually getting her doctoral degree, and came back to teach to a new generation of caregivers at a state university. Now retired, she spends the monthly pension income she earned on her home, her health care, and gifts for her grandchildren, of course. I could tell you a lot about Pat, because she's my mom. And she's just one of the 724,000 Pennsylvanians that rely on one of our two public pension systems in the Commonwealth, PSERS and SERS. Keeping the promises we've made to those Pennsylvanians isn't negotiable. The only question is how to do it. Recently, it was revealed that over the last 10 years, Wall Street money managers pocketed around $3.8 billion more from our pension funds than was previously disclosed to the public. In the aftermath of those reports, some have — oddly — claimed that the $3.8 billion isn't really a fee, or a cost, or really anything to be concerned about at all. Nothing to see here, folks, so please be on your way.
http://www2.philly.com/philly/opinion/commentary/pennsylvania-pensions-sers-psers-wall-street-investing-20181112.html

“Chief among the ACP's suggestions is to address firearm safety as a public health issue, which is opposed by the NRA and most Republicans in office. In 1996, Congress passed an amendment backed by the NRA that banned the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using federal funds to "advocate or promote gun control." Congress also cut the CDC's budget by the same amount it had been spending on gun violence research
‘This is our lane’: Philly-area doctors blast NRA over hostile tweet
Inquirer by Rob Tornoe, Posted: November 12, 2018- 11:02 AM
The NRA has drawn the anger of physicians in Philadelphia and across the country after the group mocked doctors for outlining ways to curb injuries and deaths caused by guns. "Someone should tell self-important anti-gun doctors to stay in their lane," the NRA wrote on Twitter last week, promoting a nearly 900-word unsigned opinion piece on the organization's Institute for Legislative Action website that complained that "some doctors' collective hobby is opining on firearms policy." The NRA's hostility toward doctors is a response to a new position paper from the American College of Physicians, which was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Annals of Internal Medicine and offers nine strategies aimed at reducing the number of people killed in firearms-related incidents.
http://www2.philly.com/philly/health/doctors-nra-stay-in-your-lane-twitter-gun-control-20181112.html

Despite gains, Pittsburgh city schools have work to do, A+ Schools report says
ELIZABETH BEHRMAN Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Lbehrman@post-gazette.com NOV 12, 2018 8:22 PM
While notable improvements have been made in reading scores, graduation rates and student discipline, the Pittsburgh Public Schools district has “much more work to do” to improve student math scores and close the persistent achievement gap between white students and students of color.  Educational advocacy and watchdog group A+ Schools highlighted those findings in its annual report to the community Monday, along with school-level data on school climate, racial makeup, teaching and test scores. District Superintendent Anthony Hamlet and A+ Schools executive director James Fogarty agreed that there wasn’t anything surprising in the comprehensive report and that there had been some positive changes. But there are areas in which they said the data needs to be explored further and, in the case of math scores, the school district may need to take its case to Harrisburg for clarity on state standards.
http://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2018/11/12/Pittsburgh-Public-Schools-A-Schools-plus-Anthony-Hamlet-James-Fogarty-Pennsylvania-students/stories/201811120086

Eyes on the Philly BOE: November 15, 2018
Alliance for Philadelphia Public Schools November 12, 2018 appsphilly.net by Karel Kilimnik
The nine members of the Board of Education, as government officials overseeing a $3 billion budget, have undertaken the enormous task of trying to understand the workings of the School District of Philadelphia.  The issue of equity remains a crucial one in their decision-making. Parents at Board Committee and Action meetings have expressed their frustrations at not being heard, both as members of their school’s SAC and their Home and School chapter.  One parent of a Northeast elementary school student reported that the principal at her child’s school unilaterally and unexpectedly ejected the Home & School group and ordered them to remove all of their supplies from the parent resource room. Lack of equity rears its head when some Home & Schools can raise large sums (see BOE-33 (Acceptance of Donation from the SLA Home & School Association) to pay for extra-curricular activities and supplies when schools in struggling areas cannot. 
https://appsphilly.net/2018/11/12/eyes-on-the-boe-november-15-2018/

Plaintiffs want schools to be liable for ongoing student bullying under Pa. anti-discrimination law
WHYY By Robert Brod November 13, 2018
In a case with statewide implications, plaintiffs will argue before Pa. Commonwealth Court Tuesday that school districts should be subject to the state’s anti-discrimination law when failing to intercede when students are harassed by peers based on classifications such as race, gender, religion and sexual orientation. The lawsuit centers on the alleged inaction of staff at a Philadelphia elementary school in 2011, where the plaintiff — then an 8 year-old boy — was targeted by classmates who used sexual and racial slurs to demean the student for not conforming to gender norms. Attorneys for the plaintiff say school leaders knew of the harassment and failed to stop it before it escalated to a brutal sexual assault. At a hearing in Philadelphia, they will claim that districts should be held liable for such inaction under the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act, which typically protects employees from harassment from superiors.
https://whyy.org/articles/plaintiffs-want-schools-to-be-liable-for-ongoing-student-bullying-under-pa-anti-discrimination-law/

Picking up another seat, Dems ride high on slow roll of wins
Inquirer by STEVE PEOPLES, Updated: November 12, 2018- 8:26 PM
NEW YORK (AP) — No, it wasn't a blue wave. But a week after the voting, Democrats are riding higher than they thought on election night. As vote counting presses on in several states, the Democrats have steadily chalked up victories across the country, firming up their grip on the U.S. House of Representatives and statehouses. The slow roll of wins has given the party plenty to celebrate. President Donald Trump was quick to claim victory for his party on election night. But the Democrats, who hit political rock bottom just two years ago, have now picked up at least 32 seats in the House — and lead in four more — in addition to flipping seven governorships and eight state legislative chambers. They are on track to lose two seats in the Senate in a year both parties predicted more. On Monday night, Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema won Arizona's Senate race, beating Republican Rep. Martha McSally to take the seat held by retiring GOP Sen. Jeff Flake.
http://www2.philly.com/wires/ap/week-later-democrats-midterm-success-sinking-20181112.html-2

Congress returns to new dynamic, GOP shutdown threat
Inquirer by LISA MASCARO, Updated: November 12, 2018- 6:26 PM
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress returns to a changed political landscape Tuesday as newly-elected lawmakers arrive in Washington, the parties elect new leadership and incumbents square off for one final legislative sprint before House Democrats take power. Voters swept away eight years of House Republican control in last week's election, creating a new political dynamic that's challenging President Donald Trump even before the new 116th Congress begins in January. For their last act, Republicans will try to deliver on Trump's promise to fund the border wall, which could spark a partial federal government shutdown in weeks. Newly emboldened Democrats are in no mood to cooperate over wall money. Instead, they'll be pushing to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's probe from acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker, who has criticized the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. All sides must agree to a federal funding bill to prevent a partial government shutdown from beginning on Dec. 7. "House Democrats are anything but lame ducks," Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi wrote Monday to colleagues, saying Democrats are "flying high and taking pride" in the greatest Democratic sweep of the House since the Watergate election of 1974. They picked up at least 32 seats, with several races still undecided.
http://www2.philly.com/wires/ap/congress-returns-new-dynamic-old-shutdown-threat-20181112.html-2

BREAKING NEWS: CALIFORNIA NAACP CALLS FOR INVESTIGATION OF ALL GÜLEN CHARTERS
Cloaking Inequity Blog Posted on November 10, 2017 by Dr. Julian Vasquez Heilig 7 comments
Did you know that Muhammed Fethullah Gülen Hocaefendi (pictured), an Imam who exited Turkey and is sequestered in rural Pennsylvania, is operating the second largest affiliated network of charter schools in the United States? (Yes, this is the same Gülen that Michael Flynn allegedly was trying to have extradited from the United States) In the past I have blogged about the Gülen-affiliated charter schools in the posts Bad Charters, Bad Charters, “Whatcha gonna do when they come for you” and Gulen-affiliated charter schools are bad apples? and Empire of Deceit says charters squandering taxes and violating immigration laws. When I watched the film Killing Ed, I was skeptical, as I am paid to be. So when I was in Houston to give a talk at Rice University, I ran into a former Gülen Harmony student and asked a few questions.
https://cloakinginequity.com/2017/11/10/breaking-news-california-naacp-calls-for-investigation-of-all-gulen-charters/

Betsy DeVos' staff denies rumor she's leaving education secretary job
Todd Spangler, Detroit Free Press Published 12:53 p.m. ET Nov. 12, 2018 | Updated 4:12 p.m. ET Nov. 12, 2018
WASHINGTON — Education Secretary Betsy DeVos says she's not going anywhere with Democrats taking control of the U.S. House in January, despite rumors to the contrary.  But if she stays, her life is almost certainly going to get a whole lot tougher. On Monday, in response to a question about rumors circulating that DeVos, a Michigan billionaire, Republican backer and former school-choice advocate in the state, might be looking at stepping down, her press secretary, Liz Hill, knocked down the suggestions. "The rumors are just that …rumors," Hill wrote in an email to the Free Press. "The Secretary has no plans of stepping down." There is almost universal agreement, however, that DeVos — who has made only rare appearances on Capitol Hill to testify with Republicans in charge of both chambers of Congress — is going to be asked a lot more questions in the future.
https://www.freep.com/story/news/politics/elections/2018/11/12/betsy-devos-education-secretary-job/1976260002/


Build on finance, policy, board culture skills at PSBA’s Applied School Director Training
Four convenient locations in December and January
Take the next step in your professional development with Applied School Director Training. Building upon topics broadly covered in New School Director Training, this new, interactive evening event asks district leaders to dive deeper into three areas of school governance: school finance, board policy and working collaboratively as a governance team. Prepare for future leadership positions and committee work in this workshop-style training led by experts and practitioners. Learn how to:
·         Evaluate key finance documents such as budget and audit materials
·         Review and analyze board policies and administrative regulations
·         Build positive board culture by developing strong collaboration skills
Locations and Dates:
Dec.11, 2018 — Seneca Valley SD
Dec. 12, 2018 — Selinsgrove, Selinsgrove Area Middle School
Jan. 10, 2019 — Bethlehem, Nitschmann Middle School
Jan. 17, 2019 — State College

Cost: This event is complimentary for All-Access members or $75 per person with standard membership and $150 per person for nonmembers. Register online by logging in to myPSBA.
https://www.psba.org/2018/11/applied-school-director-training-state-college/

Save the Date:  PARSS Annual Conference May 1-3, 2019
Wyndham Garden Hotel, Mountainview Country Club
Pennsylvania Association of Rural and Small Schools
https://www.parss.org/Annual_Conference

NSBA 2019 Advocacy Institute January 27-29 Washington Hilton, Washington D.C.
Register now
The upcoming midterm elections will usher in the 116th Congress at a critical time in public education. Join us at the 2019 NSBA Advocacy Institute for insight into what the new Congress will mean for your school district. And, of course, learn about techniques and tools to sharpen your advocacy skills, and prepare for effective meetings with your representatives. Save the date to join school board members from across the country on Capitol Hill to influence the new legislative agenda and shape the decisions made inside the Beltway that directly impact our students. For more information contact federaladvocacy@nsba.org

2019 NSBA Annual Conference Philadelphia March 30 - April 1, 2019
Pennsylvania Convention Center 1101 Arch Street Philadelphia, PA 19107

Registration Questions or Assistance: 1-800-950-6722
The NSBA Annual Conference & Exposition is the one national event that brings together education leaders at a time when domestic policies and global trends are combining to shape the future of the students. Join us in Philadelphia for a robust offering of over 250 educational programs, including three inspirational general sessions that will give you new ideas and tools to help drive your district forward.
https://www.nsba.org/conference


Any comments contained herein are my comments, alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of any other person or organization that I may be affiliated with.


Monday, November 12, 2018

PA Ed Policy Roundup Nov. 12: Advocates hope Gov. Wolf uses decisive election victory to seek large school funding boost


Daily postings from the Keystone State Education Coalition now reach more than 4050 Pennsylvania education policymakers – school directors, administrators, legislators, legislative and congressional staffers, Governor's staff, current/former PA Secretaries of Education, Wolf education transition team members, superintendents, school solicitors, principals, charter school leaders, PTO/PTA officers, parent advocates, teacher leaders, business leaders, faith-based organizations, labor organizations, education professors, members of the press and a broad array of P-16 regulatory agencies, professional associations and education advocacy organizations via emails, website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

These daily emails are archived and searchable at http://keystonestateeducationcoalition.org
Follow us on Twitter at @lfeinberg

Advocates hope Gov. Wolf uses decisive election victory to seek large school funding boost



PA Schools Work Summit Meetings Saturday Nov. 17th 9 to noon
Hundreds of local school and community leaders will come together on Nov. 17, to lead the fight for greater state investment in public education. #TheSummit will be held in seven locations across Pennsylvania from 9-noon on Saturday Nov. 17.



School funding was on the ballot on Election Day. We can’t let Pa’s kids down | Opinion
Pa's kids have made gains on school funding. In Gov. Tom Wolf's second term, that work must continue.
Penn Live Guest Editorial By Susan Spicka oped@pennlive.com November 9, 2018
Public education – and how it should be funded - was a core issue in this year’s elections here in Pennsylvania. Voters chose to reelect Governor Tom Wolf, who ran on his record of investing in education and restoring past cuts in school funding. Now the work fully and fairly fund our public schools must begin anew. Though progress has been made since 2015 with more significant state funding increases and passage of a fair funding formula, more is needed to make sure every student has the opportunity to successfully move on to college or a career. At one time, Pennsylvania shared the cost of educating children equally with local school districts. Today the state pays for only 37% of educational costs, the fourth lowest rate in the country. As a result, most schools are struggling to give students what they need to succeed, and many must hike property taxes to fill the hole left by the state. If there is any question, we need only read what some school superintendents recently reported as part of an ongoing lawsuit about the inadequacy and unfairness of state funding for schools:
https://www.pennlive.com/opinion/2018/11/school-funding-was-on-the-ballot-on-election-day-we-cant-pas-kids-down-opinion.html#incart_river_index

Advocates hope Gov. Wolf uses decisive election victory to seek large school funding boost
WHYY By Kyrie Greenberg November 12, 2018
Last week, Gov. Tom Wolf won a second term by defeating Republican challenger Scott Wagner. A Wagner victory would have paved the way for more school choice-friendly policies such as education savings accounts — which would divert some existing public school dollars to help parents pay for private school tuition. Wolf’s victory makes such proposals highly unlikely to come to fruition over the next four years. In his first term, Wolf’s focus was on investing more money into public education, but on the campaign trail this year he was tight-lipped about his specific plans moving forward. So the big questions now are: How much of a boost will he seek? And how will he pay for it? Advocates for a large boost to school spending say Wolf’s 17-point win over Wagner shows evidence of a mandate for a large ask.
https://whyy.org/articles/advocates-hope-gov-wolf-uses-decisive-election-victory-to-seek-large-school-funding-boost/?utm_source=dlvr&utm_medium=twitterauto&utm_campaign=social-inbound

“I understand why charter schools exist,”.... “But we’ve got to focus on improving our public schools.”
With Democratic Wins, Charter Schools Face a Backlash in N.Y. and Other States
New York Times By Eliza Shapiro Nov. 9, 2018
Over the last decade, the charter school movement gained a significant foothold in New York, demonstrating along the way that it could build fruitful alliances with Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and other prominent Democrats. The movement hoped to set a national example — if charter schools could make it in a deep blue state like New York, they could make it anywhere. But the election on Tuesday strongly suggested that the golden era of charter schools is over in New York. The insurgent Democrats who were at the forefront of the party’s successful effort to take over the State Senate have repeatedly expressed hostility to the movement. John Liu, a newly elected Democratic state senator from Queens, has said New York City should “get rid of” large charter school networks. Robert Jackson, a Democrat who will represent a Manhattan district in the State Senate, promised during his campaign to support charter schools only if they have unionized teachers. And another incoming Democratic state senator, Julia Salazar of Brooklyn, recently broadcast a simple message about charter schools: “I’m not interested in privatizing our public schools.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-charter-schools.html

Wolf’s $2M in spending lifted down-ballot Dems on Election Day | Friday Morning Coffee
Penn Live By John L. Micek | jmicek@pennlive.com Updated 8:16 AM; Posted 7:54 AM
Even as he battled with Republican Scott Wagner, Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf spread the wealth in key races in southeastern Pennsylvania, pouring cash and support into key races that helped eat away at Republican majorities in the state House and Senate. The York County Democrat pumped more than $2 million into down-ballot races in Campaign 2018′s closing days, with the money going into television advertisements, direct mail and get-out-the vote efforts across the suburbs. The work complimented efforts by the re-election wings of state House and Senate Democrats, those close to the matter confirmed. In a statement, Wolf’s campaign spokeswoman, Beth Melena, said Wolf was “proud to support Democratic candidates who will help him continue his fight to change Harrisburg.”
https://www.pennlive.com/capitol-notebook/2018/11/wolfs-2m-in-spending-lifted-down-ballot-dems-on-election-day-friday-morning-coffee.html#incart_river_index

“Maybe if all voters lobby their newly elected or re-elected representatives for a bill like this, something will happen. Legislators would have to figure out how to deal with the state constitution's uniformity clause, which says a tax rate must be levied equally on everyone, but it could be done.”
Exempt seniors on fixed incomes from school property tax | Letter
By Express-Times Letters to the Editor Ron Pizarie East Allen Township Updated Nov 9; Posted Nov 9
Months ago I contacted my state representative, Marcia Hahn, regarding school property taxes and seniors on fixed incomes. I restated the obvious: Everyone (Democrats, Republicans, Independents, liberals, conservatives, progressive, etc.) all agree on one thing -- senior citizens on "fixed" incomes should not pay property taxes. It seems to me Republicans keep trying a one-size-fits-all property tax relief bill which they know would be too expensive and will ultimately fail because of the big percentage increase in sales and other taxes to cover every homeowner. So isn't the obvious solution, at least for the most vulnerable among us, a bill just for senior homeowners on fixed incomes? The increase in sales and/or other taxes would easily be affordable to everyone, if only intended to address relief for this specific group of citizens. It's equally important to keep in mind that everyone will eventually join that group as they will all become senior citizens on fixed incomes at some point. Consider that school taxes increase a couple hundred dollars every year, forcing seniors on fixed incomes to somehow cut their yearly budget by that amount and do that year after year after year. Eventually some lose their homes because they simply can't afford to own it due to these onerous taxes.
https://www.lehighvalleylive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2018/11/_letter_455.html#incart_river_index

Philly’s Khepera Charter School loses appeal, plans to close next year
Inquirer by Maddie Hanna, Posted: November 9, 2018- 1:32 PM
Khepera Charter School in North Philadelphia, which had its charter revoked last year after complaints it hadn't paid teachers or rent, has lost its appeal to a state board and is planning to close at end of the school year. Christina Grant, head of the district's Charter Schools Office, told school board members at a committee meeting Thursday that the Philadelphia School District had issued robocalls to families and was preparing for a June 30 closure of the school, at 926 W. Sedgley Ave. Khepera's CEO, Dana King, on Friday confirmed the school's plans to close, but declined to answer further questions over the phone. She said she would respond by email at the end of the day. The K-8 school, which opened in 2004 with an African-centered curriculum, has struggled financially. In 2016, an ex-administrator sued the school, alleging he was wrongfully dismissed for reporting concerns about the school's governance and finances. The school failed to make required payments to the state pension system. In early 2017, it laid off staff. The school's landlord then took it to court, alleging it hadn't paid rent. The state-appointed School Reform Commission moved to revoke Khepera's charter in June 2017, also citing academic performance.
http://www2.philly.com/philly/education/khepera-charter-school-philadelphia-closing-20181109.html

Community school trying to break cycle of poverty in Lancaster County
AP By JEFF HAWKES, LNP newspaper November 10, 2018
LANCASTER, Pa. (AP) — Two weeks before the start of school, Joseph Torres, dean of students at George Washington Elementary School, spent a muggy afternoon visiting the homes of incoming kindergartners. A big, amiable man in a loud orange T-shirt and Madras shorts, Torres strolled through the complex of the 124 units of public housing at Franklin Terrace, waving when youngsters shouted greetings. Two faculty members accompanied Torres. Meanwhile, three other teams were stopping by homes elsewhere in Washington’s attendance zone in Lancaster’s Southeast, where over 40 percent of households live in poverty, the highest concentration in Lancaster County. Almost two years ago, the Mayor’s Commission to Combat Poverty set a 15-year goal of halving Lancaster’s 29-percent poverty rate, identifying so-called community schools — which enlist outside partners to meet needs of the disadvantaged — as one of many initiatives to pursue. While the term “community school” may bring to mind a place, it’s better understood as an equity strategy, one that helps children in high-poverty schools keep up with peers in middle-class schools. For some years, the School District of Lancaster, serving 11,300 students in 21 schools, has had six community schools, and a seventh is under development.
https://apnews.com/ac1c58bdde1c49a88da8d146396dcbed

8 businesses partner to make Erie’s Diehl Elementary a community school
GoErie By Matthew Rink Posted Nov 9, 2018 at 2:00 AM Updated at 6:13 AM
The United Way of Erie County’s community school strategy — an effort to pair community and educational resources for student success — will soon be implemented at an eighth school in Erie County. The United Way on Friday will formally announce that Diehl Elementary in the Erie School District will become a community school, joining Pfeiffer-Burleigh, McKinley and Edison elementary schools and East and Strong Vincent middle schools in the district. The community schools strategy also has been implemented at Elk Valley Elementary School in Lake City, which is part of the Girard School District, and Iroquois Elementary School in Lawrence Park, which is part of Iroquois School District. “It was almost like a perfect storm,” Laurie Root, senior vice president of the United Way, said. “They ranked near the top in terms of their high need, (being) economically disadvantaged, and other factors, like learning barriers that are being experienced by the students in the school.” That “perfect storm” also includes the fact that, for the first time, the United Way has not one or two partners on the project, but eight.
http://www.goerie.com/news/20181109/8-businesses-partner-to-make-diehl-elementary-community-school

To bolster academics, Philly schools turning to the outdoors
Inquirer by Kristen A. Graham, Posted: November 10, 2018
Robert Mitchell was 35 feet above the ground, suspended from harnesses and wires amid the tall trees of Wissahickon Valley Park, and he was terrified. "I can't do this," said Mitchell, a ninth grader, shaking visibly. Below him, a knot of his classmates from Penn Treaty High School — some of whom he knew a little, while others had been just faces in the hallway — encouraged him with shouts and claps to move forward on his Outward Bound ropes challenge. And from the tree to Mitchell's left came a voice strong and sure. "I won't let you fall, bro," said Jose Naranjo-Betancourt, Mitchell's partner on the climb, tethered to him as they made their way up trees and across ropes together. Increasingly, city students are having moments like these. The Philadelphia School District has doubled down on its partnership with Outward Bound's Philadelphia arm, spending up to $340,000 annually so students can climb tall trees, take nature walks, and complete physical challenges in one- and multi-day expeditions, all in the name of social and emotional learning. Leaders believe it will have ripple effects, ultimately boosting academics, especially among high school freshmen, whom it has targeted for Outward Bound exposure since last school year. Nationally, Outward Bound focuses on leadership, team building, and character development, primarily through outdoor experiences. The nonprofit works in 11 locations across the United States and has operated in Philadelphia for 25 years.
http://www2.philly.com/philly/education/outward-bound-philly-schools-ninth-grade-academies-20181110.html

“Legislators can take an easy step to  reduce gun deaths by passing a child-access prevention laws. These laws simply require gun owners to lock up their weapons when not in use. In the latest session, such a child-access prevention bill wasn't even heard in the Judiciary Committee.   Leaders have been killing gun-safety bills like this one for years.”
Pa.’s legislature has one easy step to save children: tougher gun laws | Editorial
The Inquirer Editorial Board Posted: November 9, 2018 - 6:15 AM
Lax gun laws kill kids.
In a study presented this week at the American Academy of Pediatrics conference in Florida, a Stanford University trauma doctor said what we ought to know by now: The weaker a state's gun laws are, the more likely it is for children to be shot to death. Pennsylvania is among those states that should hang its head low. It has the loosest gun laws in the region, and the highest death rate per 100,000 children. According to Dr. Stephanie Chao's research, there were 3.05 deaths per 100,000 children in Pennsylvania in 2015. In New Jersey, which has the strongest laws in this region, the death rate was 1.55. About 25 children die from gunshot wounds in Pennsylvania every year and about 18 die in New Jersey,  according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Nationally, Chao found that gun death rates are twice as high among children in states with weak gun laws. (Across the country, more than 17,000 children are shot every year. Of them 2,700 die, reports the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence.) Chao's study is the latest in an overwhelming body of research that correlates gun laws and gun deaths. At least since the 1990s, studies have shown that child gun deaths can be reduced in states with strong gun-safety laws. Chao specifically tracks child deaths. Research by the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence reports that in 2017, the gunshot death rate for all Pennsylvanians was 11.9 per 100,000. In New Jersey, the rate was 5.5.
http://www2.philly.com/philly/opinion/editorials/lax-gun-laws-are-killing-kids-pa-s-legislature-can-save-children-with-tougher-gun-laws-editorial-20181109.html

Paul Muschick: In light of Borderline bar shooting, give Tamaqua schools credit for addressing mass shootings
Morning Call Paul Muschick Contact Reporter November 8, 2018
“All I could think about was how helpless I was.” That’s what a patron at the Borderline Bar & Grill in California said late Wednesday night after escaping the rampage where a gunman killed 12 people. It could have been said by anyone who had been trapped in any of the previous massacres that have stained our country — at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, the Route 91 Harvest music festival in Las Vegas, the Colorado movie theater or any of the schools that gunmen have targeted. The Borderline patron’s sentiment also applies to many of us who weren’t there when the gunman opened fire. We all feel helpless when this happens and we hear about the people who perished. We aren’t helpless, though. We can try to do something about it. So far, we’ve failed to stop these shootings from happening. But that doesn’t mean we should give up. Locally, I believe the Tamaqua Area School District has taken too much flak for trying to address the issue by allowing teachers and staff to be armed. Parents, staff and others criticized the policy at a school board meeting Wednesday night — just hours before the Borderline shooting.
https://www.mcall.com/opinion/muschick/mc-opi-tamaqua-armed-teachers-borderline-bar-shooting-muschick-20181108-story.html


“The money has come from a who’s who of charter school backers and K-12 philanthropists, including Eli Broad, Reed Hastings, Lynn Schusterman, Julian Robertson, Laurene Powell Jobs, Laura and John Arnold, Dan Loeb, Michael Bloomberg and his daughter Emma, and three Waltons: Carrie Walton Penner, Alice Walton, and Jim Walton. Among Tuck’s biggest backers was Helen Schwab, wife of the finance billionaire Charles Schwab, who gave $2 million to EdVoice for the Kids PAC, which managed independent campaign committees for Tuck; Arthur Rock, the venture capitalist, gave $3 million to EdVoice, while Doris Fisher gave over $3 million. Along with the Schwabs, Fisher has been a huge backer of charter schools as a philanthropist and a consistent mega-donor for political campaigns in this space. “
Not Just Philanthropy: For Top Charter School Backers, Political Giving Is Seen as Key
David Callahan
For wealthy donors who favor charter schools, philanthropy and political spending often go hand in hand. Tax-deductible gifts flow to build new schools and train the teachers who work in them, as well as to bankroll advocacy efforts. But all this giving can have limited impact without changes in laws and policies, and so charter backers have poured ever more money into election campaigns and ballot initiatives in recent years. A case in point is one of the most expensive races of 2018, which unfolded in California, where two Democrats battled to become superintendent of public instruction. On the eve of the election, spending for this election had risen to $50 million. The total is likely to be even higher when final reporting is in. The apparent winner of the contest, Marshall Tuck, is the former president of Green Dot, a charter school network. He wants to expand charters in a state that already leads the nation in the number of such schools. The other candidate, Tony Thurmond, argued for putting the brakes on charters to address issues of transparency and accountability. Tuck ran unsuccessfully for the same office in 2014 in a race that cost $30 million. In both cases, Tuck outspent his opponent. This year, his campaign had raised $28.5 million by election day.
https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2018/11/8/not-just-philanthropy-for-top-charter-school-backers-political-giving-is-seen-as-key#.W-V-deUylaU.twitter

Why I Dread Returning to an American Public School
In Germany, my daughter’s school offered circus lessons. Now I'll have to sell wrapping paper to keep the gym lights on.
New York Times By Firoozeh Dumas Nov. 10, 2018
Ms. Dumas is a humorist and writer.
After almost six years in Munich, my family and I will soon be returning to California, and there are a few things I already know I will miss. I am not talking about the obvious (fresh pretzels, fresh pretzels with cheese, fresh pretzels with cheese and pumpkin seeds, no potholes, universal health care) but the less known differences that come with spending time in schools. We are fortunate to live in a part of Munich with top-notch public schools, similar to where we lived in America. We pay a few percentage points more in taxes than we paid in California, but holy Betsy DeVos, do we get more! Our daughter’s elementary school, which she graduated from a few years ago, offered a rich curriculum, from math and sciences to arts and languages. After school, in addition to the more traditional offerings of chess, theater and computers, she could take circus lessons, where children learned to juggle, walk on a tightrope and ride a unicycle. Since her school did not have a pool, students were bused every week to a nearby sports club for swim lessons, at no extra charge.
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/10/opinion/sunday/american-germany-public-school-funding.html


Save the Date:  PARSS Annual Conference May 1-3, 2019
Wyndham Garden Hotel, Mountainview Country Club

NSBA 2019 Advocacy Institute January 27-29 Washington Hilton, Washington D.C.
Register now
The upcoming midterm elections will usher in the 116th Congress at a critical time in public education. Join us at the 2019 NSBA Advocacy Institute for insight into what the new Congress will mean for your school district. And, of course, learn about techniques and tools to sharpen your advocacy skills, and prepare for effective meetings with your representatives. Save the date to join school board members from across the country on Capitol Hill to influence the new legislative agenda and shape the decisions made inside the Beltway that directly impact our students. For more information contact federaladvocacy@nsba.org

2019 NSBA Annual Conference Philadelphia March 30 - April 1, 2019
Pennsylvania Convention Center 1101 Arch Street Philadelphia, PA 19107

Registration Questions or Assistance: 1-800-950-6722
The NSBA Annual Conference & Exposition is the one national event that brings together education leaders at a time when domestic policies and global trends are combining to shape the future of the students. Join us in Philadelphia for a robust offering of over 250 educational programs, including three inspirational general sessions that will give you new ideas and tools to help drive your district forward.
https://www.nsba.org/conference


Any comments contained herein are my comments, alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of any other person or organization that I may be affiliated with.


Friday, November 9, 2018

PA Ed Policy Roundup Nov. 9, 2018 Have you signed up for the PA Schools Work Summit on Nov. 17th?


Daily postings from the Keystone State Education Coalition now reach more than 4050 Pennsylvania education policymakers – school directors, administrators, legislators, legislative and congressional staffers, Governor's staff, current/former PA Secretaries of Education, Wolf education transition team members, superintendents, school solicitors, principals, charter school leaders, PTO/PTA officers, parent advocates, teacher leaders, business leaders, faith-based organizations, labor organizations, education professors, members of the press and a broad array of P-16 regulatory agencies, professional associations and education advocacy organizations via emails, website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

These daily emails are archived and searchable at http://keystonestateeducationcoalition.org
Follow us on Twitter at @lfeinberg

Have you signed up for the PA Schools Work Summit on Nov. 17th?



PA Schools Work Summit Meetings Saturday Nov. 17th 9 to noon
Hundreds of local school and community leaders will come together on Nov. 17, to lead the fight for greater state investment in public education. #TheSummit will be held in seven locations across Pennsylvania from 9-noon on Saturday Nov. 17.



Philadelphia’s suburbs roar in another post-Trump election
AP State Wire By MARC LEVY yesterday
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — For the second straight year following President Donald Trump’s election, voters in Philadelphia’s politically moderate suburbs flexed their muscles to help Democrats. Bucks, Chester and Montgomery counties recorded the highest turnout rates in the state, according to an Associated Press analysis of preliminary results from Tuesday’s election. Montgomery County led the way, with nearly 67 percent turnout, and party officials there credited a groundswell of activism in response to Trump. “There was a lot of energy, and that energy started after November 2016 and grew and grew and grew, and there were a lot of motivated people canvassing for months and it just built up until November, and all that hard work paid off,” said Rep. Tim Briggs, D-Montgomery. Philadelphia’s four suburban counties, including Delaware County, accounted for a larger share of the statewide vote than they usually do, exceeding 23 percent. In past statewide elections, that percentage has topped out at just above 22 percent. Voters there flipped at least 12 state House seats and four state Senate seats from red to blue, the biggest single pickups by Democrats in decades. Democrats could expand their catch: five House and two Senate districts, all but one most recently in Republican hands, remained too close to call Thursday. Suburban voters gave Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf a staggering 320,000-vote margin over Republican challenger Scott Wagner, the biggest margin since 2006 when then-Gov. Ed Rendell blew out Republican challenger Lynn Swann in the four counties by 374,000 votes. Democratic Sen. Bob Casey also won by 283,000, beating Republican U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta on Tuesday.
https://apnews.com/ec088da0691b46c2855d2a0034091de6

How to make schools safer? District ideas range from security equipment to hiring police officers
Penn Live By Jan Murphy | jmurphy@pennlive.com jmurphy@pennlive.com Updated Nov 8, 12:34 PM; Posted Nov 8, 11:22 AM
A portion of Pennsylvania’s historic $70 million investment in school and community safety will soon make its way into school district coffers with many districts interested in using that money to buy security technology and equipment and visitor ID systems. Some $12.4 million is being doled out in $25,000 portions to 496 districts that submitted applications for consideration by the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency’s School Safety and Security Committee. In the application, a district had to identify which of 21 categories of school safety measures they viewed as areas it wanted to pursue to enhance safety and security of their buildings.
https://www.pennlive.com/news/2018/11/from-buying-security-equipment-to-hiring-school-police-officers-how-does-your-district-want-to-make-its-schools-safer.html#incart_river_index

Chronic absenteeism: School attendance can determine district quality
Beaver County Times By Dani Fitzgerald / dfitzgerald@timesonline.com Posted Nov 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM Updated Nov 8, 2018 at 5:11 PM
Test scores are a thing of the past. Well, sort of.
The Pennsylvania Department of Education has been taking notes over the last several years and concluded that a more holistic approach when evaluating school districts was needed. Specifically, the department decided to create a new district evaluation tool that puts just as much emphasis on student attendance as it does on overall academic achievement and test scores. Essentially, this new measuring tool, known as the Future Ready PA Index, says student success goes beyond getting an A on a test. And local districts agree. With the implementation of the Future Ready PA Index this year, districts throughout the region are noticing even more that absenteeism could impede student success. For instance, the Ellwood City Area School District found that 23 percent of its students are known as “chronically absent,” meaning those students have missed 10 percent of the school year — that’s two days per month. And those absences are counted whether they are excused or unexcused. District Superintendent Joe Mancini calls this absenteeism an epidemic. “If your student misses 10 percent of school, they are less likely to know how to read by third grade,” he said.
http://www.timesonline.com/news/20181108/chronic-absenteeism-school-attendance-can-determine-district-quality

Philly District test scores improve, but lag in proficiency
The notebook by Darryl C. Murphy November 8 — 4:51 pm, 2018
The School District of Philadelphia released results last week from the 2018 PSSA and Keystone exams. Although there were improvements in every subject, the District still struggles to bring students up to proficiency. District officials are celebrating the incremental victories. I congratulate our students, teachers, and principals on their continued academic progress,” said Superintendent William Hite.  “These results clearly show the hard work, dedication, and determination of everyone is making a difference.” Between 2017 and 2018, the District overall showed small increases on the PSSAs in the number of proficient and advanced students in math and English language arts, but science showed the biggest improvement, moving from 32 to 35 percent. These tests are given from 3rd through 8th grade. The Keystone exam results showed noticeable improvements in all subjects. Proficient and advanced percentages increased by four points in biology and algebra, and by five in literature. The Keystones are for high school students and given by the 11th grade. However, Philadelphia continues to lag behind the state as a whole in proficiency rates. While 65 percent of students statewide are proficient and advanced in science, just 35 percent of city students are. In English language arts, the comparable figures are 61 percent and 35 percent, and for math, 41 percent and 20 percent.
https://thenotebook.org/articles/2018/11/08/district-test-scores-improve-but-lag-in-proficiency/

Tony Williams is ‘seriously’ thinking about running against Mayor Kenney | Clout
Inquirer by Chris Brennan @ByChrisBrennan | brennac@phillynews.com  Posted: 57 minutes ago
Every Election Day, politicians in Philadelphia eat matzo ball soup and corned beef sandwiches at the Famous 4th Street Deli in Queen Village. And every Election Day, Clout pesters them with questions about power and politics.
Question One: Will Mayor Kenney have a primary challenger in the 2019 mayor's race besides former City Controller Alan Butkovitz?
Question Two: In 2020, which Democrat is best suited to defeat President Trump in Pennsylvania?
Question Three: What comes first for Philadelphia's politically powerful Electricians union: its drive to take over City Council seats in 2019 — or federal probe trouble?
http://www2.philly.com/philly/columnists/clout/clout-tony-williams-jim-kenney-challenge-mayoral-campaign-20181109.html

Blogger note: since it is a pretty light ed news day today, here are a few prior postings covering State Senator Anthony Williams and his relationship with the Students First PAC.  You might recall that Scott Wagner’s largest campaign donor this year was also Students First PAC, at a cool $1 million….
Reprise 2012: Will a PAC Pick Philly’s Next Mayor?
Students First is very interested in City Council.
Philly Mag by PATRICK KERKSTRA· 7/6/2012, 7:30 a.m.
The pro-privatization Students First PAC has been a huge player in state politics from the moment it emerged in 2010 flush with cash, much of it from three local businessmen who together founded Susquehanna International Group, a global investment company. Students First gave State Sen. Anthony Williams—a leading Democratic proponent of school vouchers—a staggering $3.65 million for his failed gubernatorial run. And ever since, the PAC has showered smaller sums on state representatives and senators receptive to the organization’s goal of sweeping education reform.
Read more at https://www.phillymag.com/news/2012/07/06/pro-privatization-pac-pick-phillys-mayor/#xdwIfimFqFMBevRq.99

“It’s a point he’s made repeatedly — and no less since public campaign finance reports released in January showed that Williams had received more donations from political action committees associated with groups pushing charter school expansion, especially the same individuals, the pro-voucher managers of the Bala Cynwyd-based Susquehanna International Group, who pumped a staggering $5 million into his 2010 gubernatorial run and contributed roughly a quarter-million dollars to a newly-formed super PAC expected to use independent expenditures to support his mayoral bid. “
Reprise 2015: Ties between Williams’ campaigns and charter school proponents run deep
His mayoral campaign manager has also worked for his biggest donors
BY ISAIAH THOMPSON  PhillyVoice Contributor MARCH 20, 2015
Anthony Hardy Williams officially declared his candidacy for mayor of Philadelphia in November, though his candidacy was assumed for a while. A few weeks ago, state senator and would-be Philadelphia mayor Anthony H. Williams addressed a gathering of self-described "progressive" voters going by the name Philly for Change, making his pitch and fielding questions. Unsurprisingly, the topic of education came up quickly.  Williams, a longtime proponent both of charter schools and private school voucher programs, has accepted substantial — almost monolithic, at times — donations from groups promoting those agendas. When the questions started coming, Williams didn’t deny his support for charter schools (he did not, however, mention the word “vouchers”) but did downplay his connection to his erstwhile donors and their agendas. “I wasn’t dependent on one interest group,” he said. “I’m owned by no one.” “If you really want to address the gravest problems (in money in politics), you’ve got to break that nexis between lobbyists, money and lawmakers.” – Craig Holman, of Public Citizen
https://www.phillyvoice.com/ties-between-williams-campaigns-charter-schools/

Reprise 2017: Champion for Charters Sen. Anthony Williams Supports What Works for Kids. Period.
Education Post by Sharif El-Mekki POSTED MAY 4, 2017
Sharif El-Mekki is the principal of Mastery Charter School–Shoemaker Campus, a neighborhood public charter school in Philadelphia, and he is a principal fellow with the U.S. Department of Education.
As an early-career teacher, there were people who made some real contributions to my classroom’s culture and instruction. Obviously, some were teacher coaches and mentors who I have written about previously. Others, were residents of the southwest Philadelphia community where I started my career. State Senator Anthony H. Williams, who has been recognized as a 2017 Champion for Charters, was one of those community members. Every year, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools recognizes the local, state and federal elected officials who lead the charge to give parents and students better public schools and the freedom to choose the school that works best for them. I remember as a fledgling teacher, Sen. Williams, whose mother was a public school teacher, would visit my class to speak with my students and encourage me. His support and encouragement was extremely beneficial. He shared his experiences as a Black student in the very neighborhood I was working in. He connected me with community leaders and engaged our students in a plethora of opportunities. He advocated for children, youth, and communities.
http://educationpost.org/champion-for-charters-sen-anthony-williams-supports-what-works-for-kids-period/

Undeterred by crushing Prop. 305 loss, school choice advocates double down on vouchers
Rob O'Dell and Yvonne Wingett Sanchez, Arizona Republic Published 6:00 a.m. MT Nov. 8, 2018 | Updated 7:55 p.m. MT Nov. 8, 2018
Less than a day after the crown jewel of their school choice policies was crushed at the ballot box, prominent school choice advocates doubled down by calling for the Arizona Legislature to promote school choice and vouchers laws.  Both the Goldwater Institute and American Federation for Children issued statements backing school choice in the hours after voters rejected by a 65-35 margin Proposition 305, a massive expansion of school vouchers.  The vote overturned the Empowerment Scholarship Account expansion that would have allowed all 1.1 million Arizona public school students to use public money to attend private school. The number of students receiving the money would have been capped at 30,000.
https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/politics/elections/2018/11/08/school-choice-advocates-double-down-vouchers-after-prop-305-loss/1923052002/

Linda Darling-Hammond vs. Diane Ravitch and Carol Burris
Washington Post Answer Sheet Blog By Valerie Strauss Reporter November 9 at 6:00 AM
I recently published a post by Diane Ravitch and Carol Burris titled “Why It Matters Who Governs America’s Public Schools,” which took issue with some parts of a new report — “The Tapestry of American Public Education: How Can We Create a System of Schools Worth Choosing for All?” — released by a California think tank founded by education expert Linda Darling-Hammond. This post is a response from Darling-Hammond and colleagues to that piece. Ravitch, Darling-Hammond and Burris are three of the most prominent voices in the national education debate about how to create equitable schools in this country and more often than not agree with one another. This piece and the earlier one reveal a split in the way they view school choice.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2018/11/09/linda-darling-hammond-vs-diane-ravitch-carol-burris/?utm_term=.152955b82445


NSBA 2019 Advocacy Institute January 27-29 Washington Hilton, Washington D.C.
Register now
The upcoming midterm elections will usher in the 116th Congress at a critical time in public education. Join us at the 2019 NSBA Advocacy Institute for insight into what the new Congress will mean for your school district. And, of course, learn about techniques and tools to sharpen your advocacy skills, and prepare for effective meetings with your representatives. Save the date to join school board members from across the country on Capitol Hill to influence the new legislative agenda and shape the decisions made inside the Beltway that directly impact our students. For more information contact federaladvocacy@nsba.org

2019 NSBA Annual Conference Philadelphia March 30 - April 1, 2019
Pennsylvania Convention Center 1101 Arch Street Philadelphia, PA 19107

Registration Questions or Assistance: 1-800-950-6722
The NSBA Annual Conference & Exposition is the one national event that brings together education leaders at a time when domestic policies and global trends are combining to shape the future of the students. Join us in Philadelphia for a robust offering of over 250 educational programs, including three inspirational general sessions that will give you new ideas and tools to help drive your district forward.
https://www.nsba.org/conference


Any comments contained herein are my comments, alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of any other person or organization that I may be affiliated with.