Monday, April 18, 2011

The state Senate's first run at establishing a voucher system for school choice crashed and burned for a couple of reasons

Here's the skinny on vouchers

By Brad Bumsted, TRIBUNE-REVIEW, Sunday, April 17, 2011
HARRISBURG
The state Senate's first run at establishing a voucher system for school choice crashed and burned for a couple of reasons.
Voucher proponents got out ahead of Gov. Tom Corbett, who didn't have the input he should have had for one of his top legislative priorities. And Republicans, particularly conservative Republicans, were divided over the issue of cost.


Commentary: Corbett misses opportunity to chip away education's fortress

Patriot News, Published: Sunday, April 17, 2011, 6:32 PM
By Laura Vecsey The Patriot-News
So much for Gov. Tom Corbett’s cameo appearance in front of Senate Republicans last week. His stated desire to lead a legislative push to give students a way out of failing schools turned into a five-minute class lecture. The outcome was that a bill authorizing school vouchers did make it to the Senate floor.

The Sunday Brunch: Where To Go Next On Vouchers.

Allentown Morning Call Capitol Ideas Blog Arpil 17, 2011
By John Micek
Anyone remember “The Trojan Rabbit?”
There’s this great scene in the 1975 screwball classic “Monty Python and the Holy Grail,” where, in the course of trying to capture a castle held by a company of daffy French knights, King Arthur and his cronies build a gigantic, wooden rabbit that they push to the gates of the stronghold.  That’s the scenario that leaped to mind last week when it was revealed that, during a private meeting with Republican senators, acting Education Secretary Ronald Tomalis let the news slip that the administration was actually on the fence about the school vouchers bill that the Senate GOP had positioned as its marquee effort for the new legislative session.

Program gets Pittsburgh students ready for Promise
Monday, April 18, 2011
By Eleanor Chute, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Darrell Sapp/Post-Gazette
Jordan Helterbran, a ninth-grader at Pittsburgh Langley High School, works on his resume in a room filled with "stickies" of comments by students about others' essays.
Pittsburgh Langley freshman Jordan Helterbran isn't likely to miss doing an English assignment again.
He knows teacher Jennifer Wright will call and email home to say he missed work or just to provide an update.

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