Thursday, April 21, 2016

PA Ed Policy Roundup April 21: School District Takeovers: Bad for Students, Bad for Democracy

Daily postings from the Keystone State Education Coalition now reach more than 3900 Pennsylvania education policymakers – school directors, administrators, legislators, legislative and congressional staffers, Governor's staff, current/former PA Secretaries of Education, Wolf education transition team members, Superintendents, PTO/PTA officers, parent advocates, teacher leaders, business leaders, faith-based organizations, labor organizations, education professors, members of the press and a broad array of P-16 regulatory agencies, professional associations and education advocacy organizations via emails, website, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn

These daily emails are archived and searchable at http://keystonestateeducationcoalition.org
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Keystone State Education Coalition
PA Ed Policy Roundup April 21, 2016:
School District Takeovers: Bad for Students, Bad for Democracy



Rally in Harrisburg with the Campaign for Fair Education Funding on May 2nd 12:30 Main Rotunda!
Public schools in Pennsylvania are a far cry from the “thorough and efficient” system of education promised guaranteed under our state constitution. That’s why we want YOU to join Education Law Center and members of the Campaign for Fair Education Funding in Harrisburg on May 2nd! Buses of supporters are leaving from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia - please register below so we can help you arrive on time for the 12:30 press conference in the Main Rotunda! Questions? Email smalloy@elc-pa.org for more details.



Education INC, film screening and panel discussion - Drexel University April 27th, 6:30 pm
Public schools in America are under attack.  Reformers seek to turn our public education system over to private investors.  Communities are catching on and fighting back.  Education INC tells the story of what happens when a local public school district is turned over to corporate ED reformers and how a community fights back to keep control.  Following the documentary film, Drexel University School of Education Professor, Dr. Erin McNamara Horvat will moderate a talk on issues raised in the film.  The talk will feature State Rep James R. Roebuck, Education Committee, Democratic Chairmen, Philadelphia Councilwoman, Helen Gym, councilwoman-at-large and Mark B. Miller, School Board Director, Centennial School District.  The event is free and open to the public.
When: Wednesday, April 27th | 6:30 pm Film, discussion immediately after
Where: Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, Drexel University
Film Screening Annex: 3401 Filbert St, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Reprise: In One Convoluted Chart, Here’s How the Students First PAC School Privatization Money Flowed in 2012

“Meanwhile, a fiscal code bill that would redirect the way $150 million in new education dollars are distributed and provide funding for state obligations on school construction projects still remains on Wolf's desk. He has until Sunday to sign it, veto it or let it become law without his signature as he did with the budget bill. The fiscal code bill passed both chambers with a veto proof majority vote.”
Cheap hotel rooms getting more expensive and other things lawmakers did for you
Penn Live By Jan Murphy | jmurphy@pennlive.com Email the author | Follow on Twitter on April 20, 2016 at 3:34 PM
Gov. Tom Wolf cleared his desk of several pieces of legislation on Wednesday by signing into law measures that the General Assembly sent him last week before recessing for the primary election break.

The taxpayers lose when power is abused
Lancaster Online Opinion by REP. BRYAN CUTLER Special to LNP Apr 20, 2016
Bryan Cutler, a Peach Bottom Republican, has represented the 100th Legislative District in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives since 2007 and serves as Majority Whip.
In 2014, the people of Pennsylvania made the decision to elect a split government: They gave Republicans the majority in both the state House and Senate while voting for a Democrat for governor.  They had the fair and reasonable expectation that, regardless of political affiliation, everyone would operate with the best interests of the commonwealth in mind.  Some people — the eternally optimistic — even believed that having both parties in power would result in superior results. They thought that taking the best ideas of the two parties to create hybrid solutions would best serve their needs.  That has not happened in Gov. Tom Wolf’s first year in office. It has been a bigger struggle to come together on behalf of commonwealth residents than I have ever experienced during my nine years as a state representative.  There have been a number of setbacks, but what is most frustrating and disappointing to me is the governor’s taking liberty with the power he was given by the voters. That power must be treated with the greatest respect at all times, and I’ve been disappointed by how he has treated it.  Most recently, the governor overstepped his bounds after vetoing the state’s Fiscal Code bill. Originally, he endorsed the fair school funding formula developed last year by the bipartisan Basic Education Funding Commission. Then, more recently, he announced he would use his own formula to distribute $150 million in additional education dollars included in the 2015-16 budget — despite a lack of legislative authorization to do so.

District evaluations reveal performance of charter schools
The first comprehensive reports by the charter office find some schools are "setting the bar," while others need improvement.
The notebook by Dale Mezzacappa April 20, 2016 — 5:22pm
The School District's charter office released detailed reports Wednesday on the academic, financial, and organizational health of each charter school in Philadelphia.  The first Annual Charter Evaluations – or the ACEs, as officials call them – go beyond common data, such as test scores and demographics, to track trends for each school, including student mobility, application process, use of discipline best practices, percentage of certified teachers, and a charter's financial health.  The big takeaway, according to DawnLynne Kacer, head of the District's eight-person charter office, is that the charter sector in the city is diverse and individual schools vary considerably. She said she hopes that understanding this will inspire a "deeper conversation" about charter schools, bringing the discussion out of the charter vs. District rut.

Philly school district releases first charter evaluations
Inquirer by Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER Updated: APRIL 20, 2016 — 1:04 PM EDT
For the first time parents, students, staff and the public will be able to see how Philadelphia's taxpayer-funded charter schools are performing thanks to evaluation reports that were posted online Wednesday.  The new reports, which will be updated annually, include information about each charter's academic performance, financial health and compliance with state and federal laws.  Marjorie Neff, chair of the School Reform Commission, said that the Annual Charter Evaluation would help bring the district into alignment with national best practices for charter authorizers.  "Its implementation brings the Charter Schools Office one step forward in using strong charter authorizing practices to close the gap created by Pennsylvania's relatively weak and outdated charter school law," she said.

School District payments to charters cut
Inquirer by Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER martha.woodall@phillynews.com 215-854-2789 @marwooda Updated: APRIL 21, 2016 — 1:08 AM EDT
The Philadelphia School District will save $15.9 million on charter school payments because the state has recalculated charter rates 10 months into the fiscal year that ends June 30.  But the new amounts set by the Department of Education are bad news for the city's 83 charters. They'll see their total revenue decline by that amount.  Under the new rates, city charters will be paid $23,720 for every special education student - $401 less than they had been told earlier. The rate for a student in regular classes is now $7,745, a $209 reduction.  The state charter law contains a formula that determines the charter rate for every district in the state based on how much the district spent to educate its own students the prior year.  Philadelphia officials said the new amount reflects the fact that the district spent less on its own students than expected in 2014-15. The charters receive a portion of the total monthly payments.

Guest Column: Let’s talk about real fair education funding
Delco Times By David Parker, Times Guest Columnist POSTED: 04/20/16, 9:51 PM EDT
State Rep. David Parker is a Republican from Monroe County.
Recently, my colleague from Philadelphia, state Sen. Art Haywood, joined Gov. Tom Wolf in his opinion piece calling for “Restoring Education Cuts First” before applying the new education funding formula unanimously recommended last year by a vote of the bipartisan Basic Education Funding (BEF) Commission – a vote which included three “yes” votes by Gov. Wolf’s own cabinet members.  Their motto would be better stated as, “Philadelphia-First.”  For 12 months, the bipartisan Basic Education Funding Commission reviewed every aspect of school funding and concluded to a candid world, that the Philadelphia School District was only underfunded by $53 million, merely 2 percent of their operating budget.  More telling, the BEF Commission declared Reading School District was underfunded by $95 million per year, which is a staggering 42 percent of Reading’s $227 million budget.  Allentown School District is underfunded by $66 million, which is 25.6 percent of their existing $257 million School budget. Lancaster School District is underfunded by $46.8 million, which is 25.2 percent of their existing $185 million School budget.

BCCT Editorial: Here we go again?
Bucks County Courier Times Posted: Thursday, April 21, 2016 12:15 am
Maybe public school superintendents are worth all that money they get paid after all.  Essentially, they’re like CEOs at big private companies with lots of financial responsibilities, from huge payroll obligations to equally huge capital expenditures, not to mention debt payments.  Unlike CEOs at big private companies, however, where budgets are completed on time and incoming revenue is relatively stable and reliable, public school superintendents are reliant on a state Legislature that rarely completes a budget on time and almost never allots funding in a stable or reliable way.  This year, the budget was nine months late. It was June 30, 2015, but was not resolved until just a few weeks ago. Meanwhile, school districts and every other government entity that relies on state funding was forced to borrow money or cut services ... or both.  But the past is past, right? Better days are ahead. Not so much.  In fact, things not only could be just as bad next year. They could be worse.  That’s what Paul Stepanoff, president of the Quakertown school board, and district Superintendent William Harner were told during a recent and very troubling visit to Harrisburg, where the Pennsylvania School Boards Association held an advocacy day forum.

The SRC's Bill Green has a strong case against Gov. Wolf
Inquirer Opinion Updated: APRIL 21, 2016 — 3:01 AM EDT
The future of the Philadelphia schools does not rest on the result of School Reform Commission member Bill Green's legal fight to regain the board's chairmanship, from which Gov. Wolf unceremoniously demoted him a year ago. But the public schools' well-being does depend on the governance of the district and the state, and Green's lawsuit raises necessary questions about both.  The Democratic governor's roughshod removal of the former city councilman over an apparent policy disagreement casts doubt on the independence and utility of the SRC at a time when it's besieged on multiple fronts. Moreover, being one of a series of ill-conceived gubernatorial assaults on semiautonomous agencies, it betrays an uncompromising approach that has kept the Wolf administration's list of achievements short.

Philly ‘ghost teachers’ making $1.5 million this year
Watchdog.org By Evan Grossman  /   April 19, 2016  /   2 Comments
Sixteen Philadelphia public school teachers are earning $1.5 million during the current school year not to teach. 
As part of the contract with the School District of Philadelphia, the local teachers union is permitted to take up to 63 teachers out of the classroom to work full-time for the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. The practice, known as “release time” or “official time,” allows public school teachers to leave the classroom and continue to earn a public salary, benefits, pension and seniority.  These so-called ghost teachers perform a variety of jobs for the PFT, serving as either information officers for other teachers or carrying out the union’s political agenda.

Who’s Next Education: 15 school leaders making a difference in Philly
Billy Penn By Anna Orso April 20, 2016
Some of the biggest debates in Philadelphia surround how the city can improve the education climate for students. Maybe the answer is universal pre-Kindergarten. Maybe it’s schools that function more like community centers. Perhaps it’s better opportunities for students to expand their education to college.  What’s already making a difference though in the lives of children across the city are teachers, nonprofit staff members and education leaders — many of whom are under 40 and represent the next generation of school leaders in Philadelphia.  Welcome to this month’s edition of Who’s Next, a feature we at Billy Penn use to highlight some of the most dynamic young leaders in Philadelphia. These winners were nominated by their peers as people who are making a positive impact at work and in their communities.

6 Lancaster County high schools among U.S. News' best of 2016
Lancaster Online TIM STUHLDREHER | Staff Writer April 20, 2016
U.S. News & World Report released its annual Best High Schools rankings on Tuesday, and once again, six out of 16 Lancaster County public high schools made the cut.  The publication awards gold, silver and bronze medals, with gold going to the top 500 schools nationwide.  Locally, the Penn Manor, Lampeter-Strasburg and Manheim Township high schools once again earned silver classifications. Pequea Valley, not ranked last year, also earned a silver.  Conestoga Valley Senior High School earned a bronze, as it did last year, while Ephrata Senior High School dropped from silver to bronze. Warwick Senior High School, a silver last year, was not ranked on this year’s list.

See which Lehigh Valley schools made U.S. News' top 85
By Sara K. Satullo | For lehighvalleylive.com  Email the author | Follow on Twitter on April 20, 2016 at 7:02 AM, updated April 20, 2016 at 12:23 PM
The Lehigh Valley didn't crack the list of the nation's top 100 high schools but three did make Pennsylvania's top 85, according to U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings. 
The national rankings take into account student performance on state standardized tests and advanced placement exams, graduation rates and other factors.  The state rankings list each school's student-teacher ratio and assign a college readiness score out of a possible 100. College readiness is based upon the number of high school seniors that took an advanced placement exam and passed.

Hatboro-Horsham 2016-2017 budget still out of balance
Intelligencer By Gary Weckselblatt, staff writer Posted: Wednesday, April 20, 2016 5:30 pm
Even with a 2.4 percent tax increase and using more than $4 million from various reserve accounts, the Hatboro-Horsham School District finds itself with a $404,478 deficit in its 2016-2017 budget.  "Our target right now is to get under 2.4 percent," said Robert Reichert, the district's business manager. He said that would mean reductions "on the expenditures side," because he isn't expecting a windfall of cash from the state.  Reichert and Superintendent Curtis Griffin briefed the school board this week on the budget, which is expected to be voted on June 20.

Possible teacher furloughs discussed at Shaler Area school board's meeting
Post Gazette By Rita Michel April 20, 2016 9:21 PM
About 100 people attended Shaler Area school board’s voting meeting Wednesday and only three spoke of concerns about the possible furlough of teachers.  Sean Aiken, district superintendent, told those gathered that while administrators and the board are in the process of considering furloughing some teachers, they also are considering other options, such as retirement incentives, leaves of absence, even part-time employment. “We actually have some people looking at this now,” he said. Saturday, April 30 is the deadline for the selection of the part-time option.  Before inviting the public to speak, the school board approved the first teacher leave, actually an extension of middle school English teacher Kristen Paul's current unpaid leave through the 2016-2017 school year. This is an example of how the district can limit furloughs, Mr. Aiken said. “We’re moving in a positive direction, which is great,” he said.  He told the parents, students and teachers gathered in the middle school auditorium to continue to attend board meetings and perhaps join their school’s parent-teacher organizations to show their support for teachers throughout the process.

State Auditor Says Pennsylvania Has Worst Charter Law in the Nation
Diane Ravitch’s Blog By dianeravitch April 20, 2016 //
Eugene DePasquale, State Auditor of Pennsylvania, says the state’s charter law is the worst in the nation.   “Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale issued a scathing report damning the state charter law Tuesday, and he blamed many of the School District of Philadelphia’s fiscal woes on state lawmakers who have not revised the nearly 20-year-old measure.  “Our charter school law is simply the worst charter school law in the United States,” said DePasquale at a news conference at the Philadelphia District’s headquarters.  “Specifically, DePasquale said, the law fails to give districts the power to ensure that only high-performing charters that serve equitable populations of children are opening. And he lamented that districts waste too much time and too many resources fighting to close underperformers.  “He blamed recent failed efforts in Harrisburg to reform the charter law on special interest lobbying.”

School District Takeovers: Bad for Students, Bad for Democracy
Schott Foundation for Public Education by John H. Jackson, President & CEO, APRIL 8, 2016
Concerns about the importance and need to mobilize Black and Latino voters in 2016 and future elections have reached a fever pitch. But in many states and cities there are counterproductive disenfranchisement actions being taken that disempower Black and Latino communities -- the takeover of their public schools. In this attack on democracy, governance by locally elected school boards is stripped away altogether. This dismantling of democracy in predominantly poor communities and communities of color is now underway, or being proposed, in several states. Denying these citizens' right to elect local school boards through state takeovers or mayoral control should sound the same alarm as denying them the vote because the impact of the action minimizes their democratic voice and vote.  The American public school system has long played a role in maintaining and strengthening our democracy. In public schools, students often learn how to become productive and engaged citizens; schools provide an infrastructure to build healthy living and learning communities; and society benefits from the substantial public good of having an educated citizenry. For these reasons parents and citizens elect local school representatives who will advance their community's unique perspectives; it is a vital opportunity to engage in the democratic process.    What happens, however, when politics overrides parents and local citizens by state takeovers of local schools, disenfranchising local citizens by removing local governance, and dismantling this fundamental vehicle of democracy?

The U.S.’s Best High School Starts at 9:15 a.m.
Why aren’t more schools following its lead?
Slate.com By Lisa L. Lewis April 20, 2016
On Tuesday, U.S. News and World Report released its annual public high-school rankings, with the School for the Talented and Gifted in Dallas earning the top spot for the fifth year in a row. The rankings are based on a wealth of data, including graduation rates and student performance on state proficiency tests and advanced exams, as well as other relevant factors—like the percentage of economically disadvantaged students the schools serve. But there’s one key metric that isn’t tracked despite having a proven impact on academic performance: school start times.  First-period classes at the School for the Talented and Gifted start at 9:15 a.m. That’s unusually late compared to other schools but is in keeping with the best practices now recommended by public health experts.

NJ PARCC problem fixed, testing to resume
Asbury Park Press by Karen Yi and Amanda Oglesby, @OglesbyAPP7:39 p.m. EDT April 20, 2016
Students will resume taking the PARCC exams on Thursday after technical problems forced school districts across the state to postpone testing and scramble to readjust classroom schedules.  Pearson, the vendor administering the online standardized tests, said it was "truly sorry" for the mass disruption on Wednesday and attributed the problem to a technical glitch.
The malfunction was "totally unacceptable," Education Commissioner David C. Hespe told state lawmakers during an Assembly Budget Committee hearing in Trenton. He put the blame squarely on Pearson.  Shortly before 9 a.m., school districts reported they could not access the online testing system. Several quickly canceled testing for the remainder of the day, shuffling students back to their normal classes.  The outage impacted classrooms throughout New Jersey, where PARCC has been a sore spot for many students and their parents, some of whom view the exams as a waste of classroom time. There was little to counter their argument Wednesday.

Testing Resistance & Reform News: April 13 - 19, 2016
FairTest Submitted by fairtest on April 19, 2016 - 1:37pm 
With stories from more than 20 states, this week's news clips again demonstrate the growing reach, diversity, energy and effectiveness of the national assessment reform movement.


Rally in Harrisburg with the Campaign for Fair Education Funding on May 2nd 12:30 Main Rotunda!
Public schools in Pennsylvania are a far cry from the “thorough and efficient” system of education promised guaranteed under our state constitution. That’s why we want YOU to join Education Law Center and members of the Campaign for Fair Education Funding in Harrisburg on May 2nd! Buses of supporters are leaving from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia - please register below so we can help you arrive on time for the 12:30 press conference in the Main Rotunda! Questions? Email smalloy@elc-pa.org for more details.

Electing PSBA Officers – Applications Due by April 30th
All persons seeking nomination for elected positions of the Association shall send applications to the attention of the chair of the Leadership Development Committee during the month of April, an Application for Nomination to be provided by the Association expressing interest in the office sought. “The Application for nomination shall be marked received at PSBA Headquarters or mailed first class and postmarked by April 30 to be considered and timely filed. If said date falls on a Saturday, Sunday or holiday, then the Application for Nomination shall be considered timely filed if marked received at PSBA headquarters or mailed and postmarked on the next business day.” (PSBA Bylaws, Article IV, Section 5.E.).
Open positions are:
In addition to the application form, PSBA Governing Board Policy 302 asks that all candidates furnish with their application a recent, print quality photograph and letters of application. The application form specifies no less than two and no more than four letters of recommendation, some or all of which preferably should be from school districts in different PSBA regions as well as from community groups and other sources that can provide a description of the candidate’s involvement with and effectiveness in leadership positions. PSBA Governing Board Policy 108 also outlines the campaign procedures of candidates.
All terms of office commence January 1 following election.

Join the Pennsylvania Principals Association at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, June 21, 2016, at The Capitol in Harrisburg, PA, for its second annual Principals' Lobby Day.
Pennsylvania Principals Association Monday, March 21, 2016 9:31 AM
 To register, contact Dr. Joseph Clapper at clapper@paprincipals.org by Tuesday, June 14, 2016. If you need assistance, we will provide information about how to contact your legislators to schedule meetings.
Click here for the informational flyer, which includes important issues to discuss with your legislators.

2016 PA Educational Leadership Summit July 24-26 State College
Summit Sponsors: PA Principals Association - PA Association of School Administrators - PA Association of Middle Level Educators - PA Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development 
The 2016 Educational Leadership Summit, co-sponsored by four leading Pennsylvania education associations, provides an excellent opportunity for school district administrative teams and instructional leaders to learn, share and plan together at a quality venue in "Happy Valley." 
Featuring Grant Lichtman, author of EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education, Secretary of Education Pedro Rivera (invited), and Dana Lightman, author of POWER Optimism: Enjoy the Life You Have... Create the Success You Want, keynote speakers, high quality breakout sessions, table talks on hot topics and district team planning and job alike sessions provides practical ideas that can be immediately reviewed and discussed at the summit before returning back to your district.   Register and pay by April 30, 2016 for the discounted "early bird" registration rate:

Interested in letting our elected leadership know your thoughts on education funding, a severance tax, property taxes and the budget?
Governor Tom Wolf, (717) 787-2500

Speaker of the House Rep. Mike Turzai, (717) 772-9943
House Majority Leader Rep. Dave Reed, (717) 705-7173
Senate President Pro Tempore Sen. Joe Scarnati, (717) 787-7084
Senate Majority Leader Sen. Jake Corman, (717) 787-1377

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